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HDTV Programming via a “Stratellite?â€

ATLANTA, Sept. 11, 2003 -- Sanswire Technologies, Inc., announced today that it has redesigned its high-altitude airship, called a Stratellite, in order to increase payload capacity and speed construction of the wireless transmission platform.


The Company has been working on the new design for several months and plans to have a demonstration model of the new Stratellite ready by the end of the year.


A Stratellite is similar to a satellite, but is stationed in the stratosphere rather than in orbit. At an altitude of 13 miles, each Stratellite will provide a wireless transmitting platform that will be able to "see" an area of up to 300,000 square miles. Existing satellites provide easy "download" capabilities, but because of their high altitude, are not practical for "two-way" high-speed data communication. The Stratellite will allow subscribers to easily communicate in "both directions" using readily available wireless devices.


The Company plans to deploy a series of Stratellites in the United States that will be used to create the nation's first National Wireless Broadband Network. When completed, subscribers will be able to access the Internet wirelessly at high-speed from anywhere in the United States and in parts of Canada and Mexico.


"The new design will give us much more flexibility. Not only will we be able to offer wireless broadband services to our subscribers, but the platform can also be used to transmit other wireless services such as cellular, MMDS, fixed wireless telephony, HDTV, and 3G/4G mobile,†said Michael K. Molen, Sanswire's CEO.


More info -- including video clips of the Stratellite -- at: http://www.stratellite.net
 

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That is an extremely interesting article. Better Internet game playing that way! :)
 

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I'm fairly sure they have none of the money required to pull this off.


Also, this idea has been postulated for about a decade.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by aviators99
The term "airship" is used in aviation circles to refer to a blimp. I'm not sure it would take much power to keep it in place.
No, I realize it doesn't need power to stay afloat, I just thought that when you got that high, there were some relatively strong and constant "jet stream" like winds that it would constantly have to fight to stay in one spot. That thing is pretty big, it's going to want to go where the winds go. I didn't see any HUGE solar panels, and they'll have to power the transmitting equipment AND the motors, 24hr/day. They mentioned something about fuel cells, but for the length of time it will be in service (was it one year at a time?), I can't imagine those being a source of power, just storage from the solar panels.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Darin
No, I realize it doesn't need power to stay afloat, I just thought that when you got that high, there were some relatively strong and constant "jet stream" like winds that it would constantly have to fight to stay in one spot. That thing is pretty big, it's going to want to go where the winds go. I didn't see any HUGE solar panels, and they'll have to power the transmitting equipment AND the motors, 24hr/day. They mentioned something about fuel cells, but for the length of time it will be in service (was it one year at a time?), I can't imagine those being a source of power, just storage from the solar panels.
The winds get higher as you go higher, until you get to a certain level (the tropopause), and then they start to diminish again. In the winter, the tropopause is as low as around 40,000 feet.
 

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Again, this is almost certainly not going to happen. It would be cool if it did, but then, Teledesic would've been cool, too. As would've been a true, commercial satellite mobile-phone service with pocket phones. Etc. etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by aviators99
The winds get higher as you go higher, until you get to a certain level (the tropopause), and then they start to diminish again. In the winter, the tropopause is as low as around 40,000 feet.
Thanks for the info, it always helps to have an aviator around. :) What kind of winds would you expect at 13 miles (over 68,000 feet)? I know a round ball isn't the most aerodynamic shape (though certainly better than a big square), and that thing is BIG. Any stabs at how much power it would take to keep that thing in one spot at the typical winds at that altitude?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Darin
Thanks for the info, it always helps to have an aviator around. :) What kind of winds would you expect at 13 miles (over 68,000 feet)? I know a round ball isn't the most aerodynamic shape (though certainly better than a big square), and that thing is BIG. Any stabs at how much power it would take to keep that thing in one spot at the typical winds at that altitude?
I think it might be calm by that point, but I'm researching to make sure. My plane doesn't go over 25,000.
 
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