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Currently 3G and 4G may require a filter to stop OTA interference depending on your locality.
Will 5G possibly stir up interference like 3&4G?
Nothing will help if you are using a pre-amp or a drop-amp. A LTE filter will only help if you are just using your antenna straight without an amp !
 

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You can use the LTE filter to block the signal BEFORE the amplifier. Then the signal is eliminated from the system and not amplified or overloaded.
 

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You can use the LTE filter to block the signal BEFORE the amplifier. Then the signal is eliminated from the system and not amplified or overloaded.
That sounds like the right answer to me. No reason why you can't use an LTE filter with an amplified system, as long as the 5g signal is removed before any pre-amps or amps.
 

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One good use for the 5G filter is to combine ota TV with sat tv on one cable. Works good with Dishnetwork Hopper and Joeys. Works with old and new Dish swm systems. The Dish Hopper and Joeys use the 675 to 875 Mhz Moca F band that work with the 5G filter to block the band from the ota tv signal [I think he meant "to block the 5G or LTE signals" since those are the ones that would interfere with MoCA F signals-jhb] being combined on to the one cable. DirecTV Genie and Minis might not work because they use the 475 to 700 Mhz Moca E band to work.
I just now noticed that quote and I quite agree. There were satellite diplexers for the "old" Dish & DirecTV systems, but they don't work with the new SWM (single wire multiswitch) systems. But now that repacking is done, you can use 614-MHz low-pass filters to fashion your own diplexers for the new Dish systems (won't work with DirecTV as the OP mentioned; the best I could manage with DirecTV was diplexing whatever few signals are on VHF, using UVSJ's as diplexers). For OTA/satellite fans, this may be the one good thing about repacking! Long live diplexing!
 

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why is that ?
The amp will amplify spurious LTE emissions and depending how close the LTE transmitter is to your antenna it will most likely overpower your TV's tuner. Even the LTE filter manfacturers mentions that all bets are off if your using an amp or any sort.
 

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You can use the LTE filter to block the signal BEFORE the amplifier. Then the signal is eliminated from the system and not amplified or overloaded.
That will only work if the original signal is not compromised, spurious LTE emissions mixed in with the original signal cannot be eliminated ! I am currently experiencing this symptom myself. My OTA set-up was working perfectly for 11 years and then Telus came and installed several LTE transmitters and my street last fall with one only 20 ft away from my antenna. With or without a LTE filter before the amp the signal simply overpowers the TV's tuner and then when the amp throttles down the gain I still get pixelatation. I have tried using attenuators and the whole nine yard to no avail. So right now I just power off the amp and just catch a few of local stations only and even some of the weaker local stations cannot be picked up due the LTE transmitter overpowering them.
 

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Maybe a
That will only work if the original signal is not compromised, spurious LTE emissions mixed in with the original signal cannot be eliminated ! I am currently experiencing this symptom myself. My OTA set-up was working perfectly for 11 years and then Telus came and installed several LTE transmitters and my street last fall with one only 20 ft away from my antenna. With or without a LTE filter before the amp the signal simply overpowers the TV's tuner and then when the amp throttles down the gain I still get pixelatation. I have tried using attenuators and the whole nine yard to no avail. So right now I just power off the amp and just catch a few of local stations only and even some of the weaker local stations cannot be picked up due the LTE transmitter overpowering them.
Perhaps use 2 LTE filters back to back before the preamp if your LTE signals are extremely strong. Maybe that would help, but just speculating here.
 

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Maybe a

Perhaps use 2 LTE filters back to back before the preamp if your LTE signals are extremely strong. Maybe that would help, but just speculating here.
You beat me to it, but this is what I would do also. I know two FM filters can work for real high FM transmissions, so I see no reason why stacking two LTE filters couldn't help. Of course, you then are dealing with adding up insertion loss, but, he already knows he has a serious problem, so it could be worth it if it helps.

Better yet, get a preamp with a built-in FM and LTE filter, such as the Televes 560383 model. I'm using one myself, and it works fine. Though my LTE tower I have to aim through is a little over 2 miles away.
 

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It is true that sometimes two FM filters or two LTE filters in series are needed to have sufficient attenuation of the signals that are causing interference. But, EdT586 is talking about spurious (extra) signals that are emitted by the LTE transmitter that are in addition to the main signal on the correct LTE operating frequency. These spurious signals can fall on the TV channels affected by the the LTE transmitter. If you filter out these spurious signals, you will also filter out your desired TV channels.

However, before assuming that the problem is caused by spurious signals from the LTE transmitter, you must eliminate other possibilities like:
1. Fundamental overload from the extremely strong LTE transmissions that are causing spurious signals being created in the reception equipment.
2. LTE signals that are getting into the reception equipment AFTER the LTE filter, bypassing the LTE filter.

With the LTE transmitter so close to the TV antenna, spurious signals from the LTE transmitter can cause interference even if you have perfect filters and perfect coax shielding from the antenna to the tuner.

One test that could be made is to connect the TV to an antenna further away from the LTE transmitter. Other tests would require test equipment like a spectrum analyzer.

I have cellular signals, but they aren't strong enough to interfere with TV reception:

UHF TV and above_3.jpg


This is Ed's problem:

Antenna is a Channel Master CM4228HD is on the roof at 32ft with a 50ft RG11 run down to the CM-3410 in the basement which is then connected to a three way balanced splitter with about a 15ft RG6 run to each TV set.
The antenna is pointed directly at 162deg at Mount Mansfield (Local transmitter is at 115deg on Mount-Royal) magnetic north and the darn LTE transmitter is pointing at the same direction of my antenna about 20ft parallel out in front, but at around 16ft high versus my antenna at 32ft high.
Dec 29, 2020 I'm in Saint-Laurent (Decarie/Poirier) district too and would like to know what that 175.016MHz RF interference is. My antenna since mid October is only able to receive most of the local channels except for 35.1, 47.1 and 62.1 and the two US channels 3.1 and 5.1 with my CM-3410 drop-amp turned off. I strongly suspect it is Telus's LTE transmitters or the city's new LED street lamps that use WiFi to control them. If you notice the street lamps your street you will see a red LED blink every 10 seconds on top of the lamp.
His caption in red on photo says:
Antenna on roof pointing in same direction about 20 ft in
EdT586AVS_Telus_1.jpg


His signal report:
RabbitEars.Info

Some very strong local signals.

Ed goes into further detail in this other thread:
>600MHz LTE filters/LPF-600 substitutes?

LTE signals affect the strongest channels and may even completely block out the strongest and weakest ones especially if you are using a pre-amp or drop amp !
I was surprised they had recently installed three of these small cell antennas near my antenna with one being less than 50 feet away. Telus is putting these eNodeB small cell antennas up by the thousands.
EdT586AVS_telus2_1.jpg


EdT586AVS_telus2 _2.jpg


When Ed removes the power from the drop amp, it acts like an attenuator. I suggested that he insert a variable attenuator in front of the drop amp instead of removing its power for greater control, but that didn't seem to work out too well:
Just a follow up. I got several fix pad attenuators and tested then, but no joy. With the drop amp on I had to attenuate to about 20dB to 23dB before the local channels would balance out without pixelation still with some minor LTE type flickers, but the US channels 3.1 and 5.1 would pixelate and become unwatchable. This now only leaves me to use OTA with the drop-amp off and not getting any of the US stations like PBS and Fox and weaker local channels like 35.1, 47.1 and 62.1.
My next purchase will be a tinySA spectrum meter in the spring, but if you are looking for great price on attenuator pads this is where I got them for less than $1.22usd each:
 

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The amp will amplify spurious LTE emissions and depending how close the LTE transmitter is to your antenna it will most likely overpower your TV's tuner. Even the LTE filter manfacturers mentions that all bets are off if your using an amp or any sort.
I understand you have a unique LTE problem compared to most but you might want to try a Televes antenna or preamp with Automatic Gain Control and LTE filter if you haven’t. Some of the older models are pre repack so the AGC would work on 37-51 and also help with the strong locals. While I don’t have the LTE problem, I do have a strong RF 28 seven miles from my home and the AGC possibly could be helping because I receive stations 60, 80 and 90 miles away (the 90 miles are most evenings, nights and mornings and sometimes days). Get a good return policy and give it a try before you give up and hopefully get it solved. That’s an unfortunate situation.

Edit correction: 37-51 not 36-51
 

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One test that could be made is to connect the TV to an antenna further away from the LTE transmitter.
At the end of the day, that's probably going to wind up being the final solution: move the TV antenna as far from the transmitter (I'm thinking it's a 5G, not LTE, transmitter, but as discussed previously, it might still use the 600 MHz band) as possible; also try to move the antenna so the 5G transmitter isn't in the same direction as the TV towers. That way you can point the antenna to "null out" anything coming from the 5G transmitter without also nulling the TV signals you want. The "LTE" filter can then clean up anything left over.

Probably a huge project, given that 50' (15m) cable run, which will almost certainly get even longer; but it sounds like it has to be done....
 

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I put the CM LTE filter inline before my drop amp and I got a couple more stations. I'm also 2 blocks away from a tall building and had multipath in the analog days. It seemed to not be as much of an issue with Digital when the switchover took place.

I'm not saying I understand the technical side of it, but when I used the CM LTE filter, it improved my situation.
 

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Are there any antennas that are made just to pickup High VHF up to 51 UHF and stop or are most on the market still picking up the telecommunication frequencies (no longer TV signals) still?
 

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Are there any antennas that are made just to pickup High VHF up to 51 UHF and stop or are most on the market still picking up the telecommunication frequencies (no longer TV signals) still?
Not that I know of. Most of the VHF-High/UHF combo antennas have been designed for 7-13 and 14-69.

There are a few UHF antennas that have been rescaled for 14-51, like the DB4e and DB8e.

No manufacturer is going to redesign an antenna for 14-36 unless they can make a profit on it.
 

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Not that I know of. Most of the VHF-High/UHF combo antennas have been designed for 7-13 and 14-69.

There are a few UHF antennas that have been rescaled for 14-51, like the DB4e and DB8e.

No manufacturer is going to redesign an antenna for 14-36 unless they can make a profit on it.
I have 7 and 9 in my area, I still need the high VHF. The LTE filter worked for me and I'm using a distribution amp. People who say it doesn't work if you are using an amp... I guess they're wrong. It says in the instructions to put it before the amplification.
 

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No manufacturer is going to redesign an antenna for 14-36 unless they can make a profit on it.
It's been trimmed down to RF 36? So most antennas are picking up massive bands of interference and if using an amplifier you are amplifying the noise as well (without a filter). I guess it depends on how many OTA customers there are and if it's worth redesigning older designs.

What about amplifiers that only amplify High VHF to 36?

I'm sure most terrestrial stations would rather have people paying cable bills and not getting their broadcast for free.
 

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What about amplifiers that only amplify High VHF to 36?
A preamp that contains an LTE filter does that.

The older LTE filters cut off above channel 51; the newer LTE filters cut off above channel 36 as a result of Repack. That type of filter is called a low-pass filter.
It's been trimmed down to RF 36?
Yes

The-shrinking-UHF-TV-band-after-June 2010_1.jpg
 

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A preamp that contains an LTE filter does that.

The older LTE filters cut off above channel 51; the newer LTE filters cut off above channel 36 as a result of Repack.. That type of filter is called a low-pass filter.

Will FCC eventually sell all the bandwidth? They are like a junkie selling home furniture. ;)
 
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