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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an ASUS TV card which I use with VirtualVCR, Snapstream and other applications that let me capture direct to AVI (HuffyUV, MJPEG, etc). I usually use straight analog capture to a SCSI hard drive and recompress later to DivX for permanent archiving. However, I've come to realize my generic TV watching/PVR needs are not quite so elaborate.


I want to get a MPEG2 PVR card so I can try SageTV. Does the WinTV-PVR series still allow for regular uncompressed AVI capture too, or only MPEG2?


If not, can I have dual tuner cards in the same PC?


Thanks

Robert
 

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Quote:
Does the WinTV-PVR series still allow for regular uncompressed AVI capture too, or only MPEG2?
The features list on their website says no, except for the old and not-so-good original WinTV-PVR. I also haven't heard of anyone doing so with the PVR-250 and 350 cards, so I don't think it's possible. In fact, that's the reason I haven't gotten one myself to try SageTV--I like to capture in lossless Huffyuv and then convert to the very efficient MPEG-4, instead of to lossy MPEG-2 and then recompressing. MPEG-2 just doesn't seem to me to be a very good and efficient format for long-term captures these days, especially when the long-term volatility of DVD+-R/W discs is taken into account. I prefer to put more MPEG-4 files at the same quality on DVD media, with parity files for data integrity purposes, and have more copies for backup.

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If not, can I have dual tuner cards in the same PC?
Yes. :) Just don't expect them to necessarily work at the same time for dual recordings or such. Uncompressed NTSC or PAL signals such as what you get when you're using CPU encoding to huffyuv are a lot to push across the PCI bus...
 

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Sorry but original WinTV-PVR not going be support by any one but WinTV-PVR 250/350 dose have a lot support
 

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Yeah, MPEG2 is lossy and not very good, problem is, 99% of the DVD players will play those files converted to VOB.

MPEG4 might be great, but I cannot comprehend replacing my Pioneer F727 w/277 DVD's in it for something much more progressive...

Sorry, didn't mean to rain on your parade...
 

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Quote:
Yeah, MPEG2 is lossy and not very good, problem is, 99% of the DVD players will play those files converted to VOB. MPEG4 might be great, but I cannot comprehend replacing my Pioneer F727 w/277 DVD's in it for something much more progressive...
To each his own. :) Personally, I just don't want to be making my own encodes to a format which is, essentially, outdated, since I can get equal or even higher quality with a lower bitrate and filesize using MPEG-4. I also cap a fair number of TV shows from which I have to cut commercials, so encoding to .AVI at first makes the files *much* easier to edit.


I know some would disgree with my characterization of MPEG-2 as "outdated" since it's still the de facto standard thanks to DVD, but it wasn't so long ago in the grand scheme that MPEG-1 was considered the de facto standard for interoperable multimedia... With MPEG-4 becoming an ISO standard (albeit not in the form of .AVI files, but with a different wrapper format) and having very firm future support across all computing platforms from big and small players alike, it's definitely a good format to encode to for the long-term. So is MPEG-2, it just takes several times the space, or sometimes compromises on the compression and resulting quality to fit in a certain space.


Set-top DVD player compatability isn't an issue for me since I output from the HTPC; I've even been considering building a small-form-factor "mobile HTPC" using one of those portable MSI or Shuttle machines for bringing my films and TV caps to friends' houses--just plug in the power cord and the S-Video or composite, queue up the media, and go. :) With the affordability of 300GB hard drives these days, that one box could hold *a lot* of at-or-near DVD-quality MPEG-4 encodes...


Anyway, it all comes down to personal priorities. For me, it's about fitting the highest possible quality into a fairly convenient filesize that maintains future-proofness, and MPEG-4 tends to fit my bill nicely. I do like the quality and options in WMV9, but not being open like MPEG-4 means a possibility of less future-proofness and fewer choices down the road for player software.


Anyway, needless to say, I *am* one of those Luddites who still encodes into huffyuv .AVI files and then batch-converts later. :) Hardware MPEG-2 decoders have very tempting PVR support like SageTV, but...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The problem is I want both, but not necessarily at the same time.


Shows I want to archive I will use HuffyUV, and convert to DivX later for saving. With editing commercials, its a lengthy process for me. However, as a PVR, using an AVI capture card sucks because it requires so much disk space and CPU power just to watch a show I will delete later.


Question for all the WinTV-PVR-250/350 users:

If I set the MPEG2 compression to a ridiculous high number, like 9mb, are there any noticeable artifacts? Perhaps taking a superbit capture and converting it to MPEG4/DivX will result in a near lossless archive???



-Robert
 

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Then in you case you want take look at Snapstream being it has a Video Recompression mode for DivX which work very good.

I have lot of MPEG example on shspvr.com look under review under WinTV-PVR 250 click on Testing but need killer clip then take look at this one

Plases rigth click and save as
http://www.shspvr.com/movie_other/na...uck_racing.mpg

Note It 96MB download.
 

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Oh Hi Sergei, how Isadora is doing?:)
 
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