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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a compression tool for making RCA cables. I'm using RG6 to make the cables. What can I test those with to make sure they are ok? Thanks!
 

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All you really need is an inexpensive multimeter. First, test for continuity or resistance between the center pin and the outside case. It should be "open" or infinity ohms. Then test the continuity from end-to-end for both the center pins and the outside cases. They should be a short or 0 ohms.


You could get something fancier, but the multimeter should do a decent job.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brettvdi /forum/post/16969870


I just bought a compression tool for making RCA cables. I'm using RG6 to make the cables. What can I test those with to make sure they are ok? Thanks!

What kind of RG6 and what application are you planning to use the RCA cables for? Your question on how to test makes me wonder if the wrong cable was used for your application.


Thanks.


Carl
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Excellent, I have a multi-meter but I wasn't sure if that would work, thanks! I might go check out the one lowes as well.


I was making component cables and coax audio.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brettvdi /forum/post/16971993


Excellent, I have a multi-meter but I wasn't sure if that would work, thanks! I might go check out the one lowes as well.


I was making component cables and coax audio.

What kind of coax are you using? A simple continuity test won't tell you if it will work well for component and/or audio cables....


Carl
 

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If the ends don't fall off and they seem to work, cables are about as good as they are going to get. If you have an open in either the shield or the center conductor circuit, they won't work. If you have a short between the shield and the center conductor, they won't work. Unless you have a reason to check them before installing them, like you are making them in one place and installing them in another, there is really no need to use a meter. Generally, all you will see is continuity or no continuity. There are some cases where you might see 10s or 100s of ohms resistance which would indicate a problem, but the cable probably won't work well anyway.


If you really want to know how good the cables are, you will have to use an expensive piece of equipment like a time-domain reflectometer.

Cable performance is affected by a number of factors including that basically boil down to impedance mismatches that cause reflection of part of the signal. This is an issue in video, RF, and digital audio cables, but not in line level audio cables.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies. I made some that seemed to work fine but since I've never used those before. I wanted to make sure I wasn't getting any serious signal loss because of first time syndrome.


Thanks again!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brettvdi /forum/post/16971993


I was making component cables and coax audio.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brettvdi /forum/post/16972308


rg6u quad shield 75ohm/2300mhz cl2 18awg

NOTE: That is not the best cable for those applications. For video or audio transport, including baseband (composite) and component, you should be using a cable that has a pure copper center conductor, not copper-clad steel. The outer shield should also have copper braiding, not aluminum or steel.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cctvtech /forum/post/16975280


NOTE: That is not the best cable for those applications. For video or audio transport, including baseband (composite) and component, you should be using a cable that has a pure copper center conductor, not copper-clad steel. The outer shield should also have copper braiding, not aluminum or steel.

Agreed. Quad shield is not the coax for this application. Either way, you should be using something with a Bare copper center conductor. For normal audio, something with a 95%Bare copper braid is fine. For video applications like HDTV over component video, you really should use something with a bare copper center conductor, 100% foil shield, and 95% tinned copper braid. You need the foil for higher frequency applications. For baseband video (yellow connector on your equipment) and regular audio/video interconnect, regular 95% bare copper braid (normally used for CCTV applications) should work fine for you.


Regular continuity testing will not show the diminished signal that you are getting due to using the wrong coax for your application. Non-consumer testers would be required where you could measure attenuation at many different frequencies.


Hope this helps.


Carl
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great information, thanks!

Quote:
Regular continuity testing will not show the diminished signal that you are getting due to using the wrong coax for your application. Non-consumer testers would be required where you could measure attenuation at many different frequencies.

I assume that would be pretty expensive for minimal home use.
 
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