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Hi,


after spending the week end reading various posts, I'd like to ask a few questions:


1. when connecting a sub, why would one use LFE or speaker inputs? IS one more suitablle for a particular purpose, is it based on the amp/receiver capability, or rather a matter of taste.


My receiver is Onkyo 606, I am leaning toward LFE.


2. What does "ID company" refers to? I read this many times and can't figure it out.


3. Many posts in this forum were not favorable to subs from Polk Audio. Understanding that there are better/more capable products out there, can one tell me where products such as DSW Pro 500 or 600 fall short?


Many thanks for all the great info.

Remy
 

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In addition to the above post, there are different connections on subwoofers to allow for different configurations and gear (obviously). Typically, using the LFE (sub out on the receiver, line-in/LFE on the sub) is the simplest, and it allows you to set the crossover for the sub in the receiver itself, rendering pretty much all the controls on the back of the sub ineffective (except gain/volume). Using the speaker-level inputs on the sub means instead of connecting the front speakers directly from the receiver to the speakers, you would instead connect the wire from the receiver to the subwoofer first, then from the sub to the front speakers. In this scenario, all the controls on the subwoofer are active, since you would need to set phase, crossover, etc. on the subwoofer itself. This is typically used in systems that have older receivers/pre-pros that lack a dedicated sub-out, or in 2-channel systems used more for music.
 

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In addition to simplicity, utilizing the LFE will allow you to Bi-amp your system. When you utilize the crossover in the processor, your system will only amplify the frequencies your speakers will be reproducing, and allow the subwoofer's amplifier to do the rest. Since Bass frequencies are the most power hungry, this frees up more power for the remaining frequencies allowing greater clarity.


When using the LFE output and the processor's internal crossover, it is important to defeat the low-pass crossover integrated into the subwoofer. If there is no defeat, then turn the low-pass crossover to the highest frequency possible.


If your subwoofer would require a LFE run over 50 feet then it would be desirable to utilize the speaker wire connections. You can do this two different ways. With either of these to methods it is important to go into your processors speaker set up and set the main speakers to large, all other speakers to small, and your subwoofer to no. This will route all LFE information to the main speakers, which will be intercepted by the subwoofer.


The first is by running speaker wire to the subwoofer, then onto the left and right main speakers. If the high-pass filter is not adjustable, consult the owners manual of the subwoofer to determine the high-pass frequency setting. Besure to set your Lowpass filter no lower than this setting.


The second is to run wire from your amplifier to the subwoofer, and another set of wire to the main speakers. In this set up your main speakers will be playing all frequencies, and you need only adjust the subwoofer's low pass crossover to determine when it kicks in to reinforce the mains.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by basshound /forum/post/19559825


If your subwoofer would require a LFE run over 50 feet then it would be desirable to utilize the speaker wire connections.

Nope. Use the RCA which is a high-impedance voltage connection and will not lose power over a long run, as will speaker wire.

Quote:
The first is by running speaker wire to the subwoofer, then onto the left and right main speakers. If the high-pass filter is not adjustable, consult the owners manual of the subwoofer to determine the high-pass frequency setting. Besure to set your Lowpass filter no lower than this setting.

OK.

Quote:
The second is to run wire from your amplifier to the subwoofer, and another set of wire to the main speakers. In this set up your main speakers will be playing all frequencies, and you need only adjust the subwoofer's low pass crossover to determine when it kicks in to reinforce the mains.

Not a good idea as you will have double bass and run the chance of blowing out the (small) main speakers.
 
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