AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
812 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, in the process of wiring my (new) house. Here's what I've got so far:


2 cat-5 into every room

1 coax into every room


Planned:


Leviton distribution panel (for network, coax, and phone)


QUESTION: I'm just now figuring out I need video in AND out in every room (here goes another trip into the attic!), but my question is whether or not another coax will suffice? That is, should my video in and out both be coax? If so, am I going to lose a lot of signal strength going from a distribution panel in the basement all the way up to the 2nd floor (approximately 120 feet of coax)? If so, how do I solve this problem? A repeater? What does a repeater cost? Is there another solution (i.e. different wiring process)?


For Reference: All of the wiring runs are 'home runs' and I intend on using either analog or digital cable as the video source.


TIA,

David
 

· Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
When you say "video", do you mean CATV or do you mean baseband video? What are you distributing on this "video" cable?


Assuming you meant CATV then a standard RG6 CCS center conductor will work fine. 120' should pose no problem in most setups.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
812 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
referring to CATV & DVD, VCR, ReplayTV output. I'm new to this stuff, but my thought process was/is that video "in" into a given room could be: CATV (digital or analog) as well as video output from another device in another room (i.e. DVD player in my living room, want to watch a movie in my bedroom). Is that how this video distribution gig works? If not, then what exactly are people referring to when they refer to video distribution (other than a DBS or CATV signal). What would a "video out" be used for?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
David,

There are different ways of getting a signal into a room. One method is to use baseband video which would be like the composite video output on your DVD player or VCR. The other method is to use RF distribution which would be like the 'antenna out' on your VCR. Baseband video is a lot trickier to distribute so most installations will use an RF distribution method. In the RF method you would hook your baseband sources into a modulator which would convert it to an RF signal. Once in the RF spectrum it can be mixed with other RF sources like your standard CATV feed, then distributed to each television location. If you are planning to send high quality baseband video then consider running an RG cable with a solid copper center conductor and a >95% braided copper shield. RG59 should work fine. Keep in mind that you will not be able to mix baseband video and RF on the same cable at the same time. For your RF applicaitons you will want to use a standard RG6 cable.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
Just wanted to clarify, when I say you can't mix baseband and RF on the same cable, let me use the correct term which is that you can't mix baseband and broadband on the same cable. Baseband is a single relatively low frequency signal, Broadband is a spectrum of channels like channels 2-161, etc.... When you're modulating a baseband signal you are inserting it into a broadband channel.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top