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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got my "powerbridge" on the way from monoprice, as well as their flat mount for my 52" XBR6


I've got (2) single gang old work boxes for the outlet side of the powerbridge, but I went to the local big box stores today and took a quick look at some romex (was in a hurry for work, so didn't have time to stop) and I noticed there are 20+ types of romex.


I basically figured I need somewhere in the 12-14 range, but not sure if I need 12-2, 12-4, 14-2, 14-4????


Anyone that can help, i'd really appreciated it!
 

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12-2 is your best bet. 20 AMP support and you are good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yeah I was just reading that 14 is only good for 15amps, so 12 sounds good to me.


What is the difference in 12-2 and 12-4 (i assume it means 2 conductor and 4 conductor) and why you would use one or the other
 

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the 12-4 has more conductors allowing you to run multiple circuits with a single cable, or so I believe. since you are doing a single circuit you only need 12-2. I will let a real electrician explain it better...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
well the funny thing is im very familiar with 110v and 220v, but we use different types of wiring where I work (I install all of the electrical components in firetrucks and other rescue apparatus)
 

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Is this circuit a 20amp circuit? If so then you absolutely want to run at least 12-2... or risk the wire melting and starting a fire.


going with 12-2 is a safe bet, but running it on a standard 15 amp circuit is a bit overkill.

I doubt that your TV will pull anything close to 20amp.


As for the 12-4... that doesn't make sense to me, why would you just go in and out of the plug... from plug to plug... you don't need 4 wires to wire two plugs on the same circuit.


I know that 14-3, etc is used for wiring 3 way light switches... but I am not an electrician and my advice should be taken that way
 

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Guys I have a question. Instead of using Romex can I use BX-armored cable for the powerbridge? I live in NYC and believe its not up to code if I use Romex cables.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by maximo78 /forum/post/15522943


Guys I have a question. Instead of using Romex can I use BX-armored cable for the powerbridge? I live in NYC and believe its not up to code if I use Romex cables.

Sure you can use that if it meets code, but if romex doesnt meet code then chances are the plastic boxes wont either and you should consider metal ones. When I installed my power bridge I used hard conduit and metal boxes.
 

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My home theater is a 2.0 1978 "Sears by Fisher" (same as Fisher RS-1030). I love Vintage.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pennektj /forum/post/15465976


As for the 12-4... that doesn't make sense to me, why would you just go in and out of the plug... from plug to plug... you don't need 4 wires to wire two plugs on the same circuit.

Two receptacles can be wired with 12-2 if they are "Daisy Chained". However, this could more easily overload the circuit if to many appliances are plugged into them.


The reason for running two sets of wires is so that you can use two separate breakers, one for each of your receptacles. This not only reduces your chance of overloading your circuits, but also if connected properly in your load center, will balance the load on your meter.
 

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That makes sense... so you would wire the top plug with one set and the bottom on another set. And eliminate the need to pull two wires... Huh, learn something new everday


Quote:
Originally Posted by my3rdgen /forum/post/15524013


Two receptacles can be wired with 12-2 if they are "Daisy Chained". However, this could more easily overload the circuit if to many appliances are plugged into them.


The reason for running two sets of wires is so that you can use two separate breakers, one for each of your receptacles. This not only reduces your chance of overloading your circuits, but also if connected properly in your load center, will balance the load on your meter.
 

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with 12-4 you could have a 240v load and a 120v load. 12-4 could also be used for a 3-phase load but not in a residential application.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pennektj /forum/post/15524154


That makes sense... so you would wire the top plug with one set and the bottom on another set. And eliminate the need to pull two wires... Huh, learn something new everday

But if you are connecting the whole thing to an existing socket, this would defeat the purpose, wouldn't it? You would have to pull the wire all the way to the circuit breaker, right?


Thanks,


Mitch
 

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I installed the Powerbridge in November. It was really easy to install. The wiring is just simple romex, I used 14-2. I ran it in the wall at the same time and path as my HDMI and video cables. I have NO interference of any kind.


The whole idea of the powerbridge kit is you DON'T have to run back to the panel or run to any of the existing "hot" electrical wiring. The best reason to install a powerbridge is you can plug the power-cord into a surge protector, where as you CANNOT do that if you just tap off the back of an outlet or wire back to the panel. I wouldn't hesitate to install a Powerbridge kit, even if you have no clue about electricity.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by avnuttyguy /forum/post/15730154


I installed the Powerbridge in November. It was really easy to install. The wiring is just simple romex, I used 14-2. I ran it in the wall at the same time and path as my HDMI and video cables. I have NO interference of any kind.


The whole idea of the powerbridge kit is you DON'T have to run back to the panel or run to any of the existing "hot" electrical wiring. The best reason to install a powerbridge is you can plug the power-cord into a surge protector, where as you CANNOT do that if you just tap off the back of an outlet or wire back to the panel. I wouldn't hesitate to install a Powerbridge kit, even if you have no clue about electricity.

What I meant was that if you split the top and bottom receptacles of the new outlet and run 12-4 wire as the other poster said, this will reduce the load only if you run them to the circuit breaker. If you do this and run it to a nearby outlet and connect it there, you are not reducing the load on that circuit. Isn't this correct?


I agree with what you said about powerbridge.


Mitch
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by makman /forum/post/15730210


What I meant was that if you split the top and bottom receptacles of the new outlet and run 12-4 wire as the other poster said, this will reduce the load only if you run them to the circuit breaker. If you do this and run it to a nearby outlet and connect it there, you are not reducing the load on that circuit. Isn't this correct?


I agree with what you said about powerbridge.


Mitch

Honestly I'm not a licensed electrician, but I have done my share of wiring/rewiring my homes in the past. I'm pretty sure if you "branch" from the back of any outlet, you do in fact add load "potential" to that circuit. I recall an inspector in MN where I used to live awhile back, made me reduce the amount of outlets I had wired in branch configuration.


Mitch, maybe I'm not understanding your point... ???
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by my3rdgen /forum/post/15524013


The reason for running two sets of wires is so that you can use two separate breakers, one for each of your receptacles. This not only reduces your chance of overloading your circuits, but also if connected properly in your load center, will balance the load on your meter.

My comment began with the above quote, and then some replies to it. Perhaps I was wrong, but I think there were comments after the above to the effect that you can use 12-4 to connect the top and bottom of a receptacle that have been split from each other (by breaking the tab that makes the top and bottom share the current) and connect them to a nearby live receptacle, rather than directly to 2 circuit breakers at the panel. To reduce the load of having all the equipment on one circuit, you must connect both sets of wires in the 12-4 to separate breakers at the panel. If you just connect both of them to the same nearby live receptacle, than all the load is on that circuit. Splitting the top and bottom serves no advantage.


Make sense?


Mitch
 

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So if you have your power conditioner plugged into a 20amp circuit with multiple equipment plugged into, does your Powerbridge need to be a 20amp powerbridge or can you use a 15 amp?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KERMIE /forum/post/15766291


So if you have your power conditioner plugged into a 20amp circuit with multiple equipment plugged into, does your Powerbridge need to be a 20amp powerbridge or can you use a 15 amp?

just ran across your question. I think what your asking is your main outlet is on a 20 amp circuit and having your surge protector plugged into that does the powerbridge kit have to be 20 amp as well.. ??


Not that I can see, because your surge protector is output at 15 amps, which has nothing to do with it plugged into a 20 amp outlet. I'm sure if you call Powerbridge or email them they'll confirm this as powerbridge only extends the output power and has nothing to do with upping the amperage.
 

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2005 nfpa70 allows for installation of 15 amp recepticals on 20 amp branch circuits, though some municipalities have ammended that out. But even if local ordinance requires 20a receps on 20 amp circuits, you may be able to get around that if your surge suppressor contains ul listed overcurrent protection rated at 15 amps. also see nfpa70 110 3b


regardless of the powerbridge you install, you need to run 12awg because you are extending a branch circuit protected at 20 amps, and there is no garraunty that the next homeowner 20 years from now wont just plug an extention cord from your 20a duplex to the powerbridge inlet, thus creating a potential hazzard.
 
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