AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,366 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm pretty much a novice when it comes to cables but I assume what I'm about to ask for information on is not an unusual need, I just couldn't figure out the right search to find it.


I have dual subs 30' and 40' away from my receiver. I want the wires to be hidden in the walls and my receiver has one pre out connection. Is this how I would tackle it?


1. Connect an RCA male to F-type female adapter to the subwoofer out on the receiver.

2. Connect some RG-6 QS cable from step 1 to an RG-6 splitter.

3. Connect more RG-6 QS cable from the splitter through the walls to two in-wall face plates that have F-type adapters.

4. Connect an F-type male to RCA female adapter to each wall plate.

5. Connect RCA male subwoofer cable between the wall plates and each subwoofer.


I'd appreciate the advice of others that have either done this or understand the issues involved. Thanks.


Note: I also posted in the Theater Builder forum, I wasn'y sure which would give the best results.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
Judging by your post, I appreciate that you have cabling knowledge.


The only suggestion I would add would be to use a quality RCA splitter at the sub output of the receiver. Then run each leg of RG6 from that splitter.


That being said, I can appreciate if you would prefer the single RG6 to carry the signal to the attic and then splitting the signal, in which case I might also suggest using RCA-to-F adaptors at the in-attic junction.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,366 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
coach,


Thanks for the feedback. This is a finished room in the basement so to simplify wiring and still hide it, I was planning to build out the lower half of the walls, add accoustic panels, and hide the cabling behind. Also, my plan is to build a wall on one end to flush mount the equipment and allow me to get behind to the equipment connections. Thus, there is no attic or open space other than behind the equipment. Therefore, I see now that putting the "Y" in the wall is probably not a good idea (in case I run into issues down the road).


I'll go the route of a quality RCA splitter at the receiver (for accessibility) and dual RG6 cables from the splitter and through the walls to the subs.


I can now see why these types of projects are so addictive and time consuming. I have made some purchases but have not actually built anything yet. Everytime I turn around in this planning phase there is something else I forgot to consider. I don't know what people did before there were forums like this to consult for advice.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
I did not know that you could run a speaker signal through RG-6 coax. How is the sound quality for non-sub speakers? I was planning on using regular speaker wire, of varying guages, and terminating into wall plates for each speaker, with banana connections from the plate to the speakers.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
Uther, I have not heard of anyone using RG6 for speaker cable. I am not sure that it wouldn't work, but I would be a little concerned about the resistance of RG6(75ohm) when used as a speaker cable. RG6 does work exceptionally well for line level signals and digital signals.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Uther,


What Coach is saying is that the RG6 here is being used for a line-level input to the sub, not a speaker connection.


You could use RG-6 for speakers, but it doesn't do much good unless you have to run near AC power cables, and it is essentially only 16 or 18 ga. The 75 Ohm rating of RG6 applies to high frequencies only - in the audio band it has the same resistance as plane old speaker wire of similar gage.


To sum it up, you COULD use it, but why would you want to?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by coach
Uther, I have not heard of anyone using RG6 for speaker cable. I am not sure that it wouldn't work, but I would be a little concerned about the resistance of RG6(75ohm) when used as a speaker cable. RG6 does work exceptionally well for line level signals and digital signals.
Coach, so would you use RG6 QS to build a long (over 40 ft) video component connection? I could run three lines and save myself some serious $$$$. Just starting the design process, all my gear will be in an equipment closet, leaving me at least a 40 ft component connection run. Any recommendations for a long S-video run too?


Thanks and sorry to go a little off topic, I was searching for In wall subs, so this post has already been a huge help!! thank you!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,433 Posts
Quote:
so would you use RG6 QS to build a long (over 40 ft) video component connection?
I've already run some of the RG6 for this. I got the idean in the Builders forum. I'm using QS from Home Depot for this, sub cables, DirecTV wiring and modulated video to the rest of the house.

Quote:
Any recommendations for a long S-video run too?
Smart Home.com has converters for S-video to cat-5 and s-video to dual coax. I haven't decided which one to use.


-Robert
 

· Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Thanks Robert,


Sounds like RG6 QS is the way to go for my component, sub-woofer runs. As for s-video, I think I look into Cat 5, or at least Cat 5e, it should have more bandwidth. looks like I better head over to the builders fourm first!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top