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I just got a Gateway DLP. It has two large built-in speakers (in its base). They lift the rest of the set off the TV stand, and make it pretty hard for me to continue to use the center channel speaker that I already own.


I have a SONY receiver with a single center-channel output, but it's a speaker output. My Gateway has 2 RCA jacks. The Sony gets its input from the digital outputs of my cable box and my DVD player.


So, I went to my local parts store, and I bought a stereo attenuator. I already had regular audio cables. The attenuator takes four speaker leads, and turns them into 2 RCA jack outs, reduced by 30 db.


Next, I ran two wires from each of the two speaker outs on the SONY receiver. I plugged these four wires into the attenuator. Then I plugged two audio cables into the other end of the attenuator and connected these to the TV-audio-in.


This should give me the cener channel coming out of the Sony running into the speakers in the TV.


Here's the problem -- when I run the Sony at respectable volumes, everything is fine, but when I turn up the volume to louder (not really all that loud), the Receiver goes into "Protect" mode, and it shuts itself off.


I have very recently used the Sony with a conventional center channel speaker (from Cambridge Soundworks) and it worked fine, so it's not the receiver. And, if I turn the center channel off, I can make the receiver (and the other speakers) as loud as I want. So, it's directly related to the center channel. Thinking that maybe I was reducing the load too much on my center channel output (by trying to run both of my Gateway's speakers), I removed one, and I only ran my Sony output to one speaker. The problem conitnues.


Thanks in advance for any useful input !




Annyone
 

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Try connecting the plus of one attenuator to the plus of the receiver, the minus of the other attenuator to the minus of receiver and wire the remaining plus and minus of the attenuators together. This would give you 4 times the impedance you had in the first wiring, and twice what you had in the second. Maybe that'll be enough to keep the amplifier happy.
 
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