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Since I interrupted the Womble pricing for the new version thread, I wanted to take DJ's advice and start this new thread that will definately help me and other newbies work through editing Mpeg2's with Womble and getting them to DVD or VCD.


Here is my original post:


I am a total newbie to Editing Digital Mpegs and I am going to buy the Womble product for use with my Replay downloads into DVArchive.


However, since I have never used any of the products discussed in the forum I surely need help. Not generalized help but rather step-by-step processes on how to take the Mpeg2 through to DVD Burn.


I would be happy if someone with good technical writing abilities could walk some of us through opening Womble (new version 3.14), which buttons to ckick for GOP Fix(?), editing commercials and saving the edited file.


I hope I'm not asking too much, and if these instructions are posted in another thread please point me there.


-------------


Since there were a few replies in the Womble "New Pricing" Thread, I have taken that advice already.


I guess what I'm looking for, not to rehash everything, is a good guide for us "Dummies" beyond the Womble documentation.


Step-by-Step from Saved DVArchive File to Womble to DVD Authoring would be the best (any product, I know that ULead was mentioned).


Here is the link again the RichA's site posted by DJHeater:

http://www.pcphotovideo.com/womble.htm


Thank you.
 

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There is a ton of information on this forum already, but I agree that it takes a while to sift through. Maybe it would save some time if others link to threads that have been useful to them. I remember one thread titled, New to Womble - having problems that covers a lot of ground. In addition, I know RichA has a lot of long posts that go into great detail on some of the finer points. I wish I had a consolidation of all his Replay to DVD posts, as I don't know anyone with more experience than him.


Tim
 

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I was just going to post about that thread.


Here's a direct quote from grover517 in it:


I am not an expert in Womble, but I do see a difference in what you are doing and what I do to get "perfect" dvd's after editing.


1. First I "copy" the original mpg from my dvarchive directory to a work area so I don't screw up the original.


(from here out, employ the Heathriel method, Thanks Heathriel!)


2. Run the GOP fix in Womble against the copied file.


3. Load the "fixed" mpg back into Womble, and copy the parts I want to save to the clipboard.


4. Save/Record each part with a naming convention such as clip1, clip2, etc.


5. Go to "Tools", "Video Clip List" and add all of the recorded clips into the list in the order you desire and click "OK". The clips will be merged into one big file.


6. Re-save/Record the new merged file one more time just as you did with the clips giving it a final file name.


7. Load the resulting file into your favorite DVD/VCD software and go get a drink!


Hope this helps,


Jay
 

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I'm a total newbie too, but I've been reading various threads for several days now. In the Womble Reprice thread, I noticed that several people had questions about how to use Womble GOP fixer.


You can find Rich A's instructions on how to use the GOP fixer from this post , which is on page 2 of the above-mentioned New to Womble thread.
 

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After the GOP fix, I find it easier to locate the start of a commercial segment and place a "MarkIn." Then I locate the end of the commercial segment and place a "MarkOut." Then I select "Cut" and it deletes the marked commercial segment. Once all commercials etc. are removed, I hit "Save." In the save window I hit the "All" button to select everything, then set the file name, and select MPEG-2 Program Stream, and then hit Save.


Done.
 

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Hi all,


I will lurk around this thread and try my best to answer any questions. I'm not an expert in all of the Womble areas, but am pretty familiar with the basics. I will also see if I can update my page on how to do simple edits with Womble and put some pictures and more how to's. I've been using Womble for a long time now.


A point to consider. There's some sort of debate on which is better, to simply "cut" out unwanted parts as you go along and then save the whole thing, or to "copy" the WANTED parts to the clip board and then bring them back onto the work area one by one joining them.


This is typically a "newbie" question. In the editing world the more logical approach would be to use the clip board to compile you movie. The "cut" part (where you only cut out the portion you don't want and let the program re-join the parts automatically is not the normal way to do it but of course is there for a reason.


The Womble editor does a better job overall when you pull existing clips from the clip board and drop them on top of each other in the work space to join them in the order you want. This takes VERY little time. (I timed it and found it took me all of 15 seconds to add 6 clips with simple joins)


If you don't do this and you are "cutting" out say 5 or 6 commercials, then you MIGHT stand the chance of a problem with the joined sections. Problems such as a "jump" and more often an audio sync problem. I'll not go into the hows and whys of it. Just remember .. if you work from the clip list you'll almost never have a problem. (I never say "never" heh heh) But if you do the cut method, the chances of having a problem are high.


Now .. for the newbie .. WHY save your wanted clips to the clip board and then assemble them ??


When you become more proficient at these things and start doing advanced stuff, you'll see the worth of this. Here's just one example that I do all the time.


Usually some TV series will have a "lead in" segment, followed by the "introduction" and then the first play item taking off where the lead in ended. I "COPY" the clips clip to the clip board. The first is left simply as "clip1". Then the 2nd clip is copied and that would be renamed as "intro". The the rest of the clips in order. So when I'm done I have clip1, Intro, Clip2, clip3 and so on.


Now we have the ability to mix and insert those clips in any order. Of course the only one you'd WANT to put separately is the "intro" clip. Sometimes what I do is to bring to the work area the INTRO clip as first. Then I bring clip #1. Then Clip #3. Usually I add a nice "merge" FX effect between the intro and the first clip.


The result is very pleasing to view. You still get the intro and then it melts away to the beginning of your movie. Which then is played uninterrupted for the remainder.


Other times I save the intro all by itself. Then when I build my DVD I use the intro separately as a play option in the "scene selection" part of my DVD.


A second reason to do it by saving to the clip board is this. Once you do have them all saved to the clip board, you should choose to SAVE the Womble editor project. Then you can go about "assembling" your movie. By doing this, if you have an "oh oh" and everything becomes toast, you can simply re-start Womble and load the saved Editor Project instead of the un-edited mpeg. All the clips will still be there and you won't have to start from scratch.


A third reason to do it this way is that it allows you to have some fun with transitions. When you drag one clip onto another, Womble will open up a "transition" window where you can select from many special effects. Of course you can just choose no effect and join them. However with today's time compression being done by the commercial stations, you'll find that sometimes there is no natural transitions between the end of the commercial and the beginning of the next movie play segment. Like frame number 1999 is the full screen of the commercial and frame number 2000 is the first full frame of the movie. Just a very aggravating "cut to" the commercial or cut from the commercial with NO black space or merge. THIS is where you'll love the frame accuracy of Womble.


Here's what I do to make my DVD's more enjoyable. While editing, if I find one of those spots where there are no transition frames between the commercial and the movie .. I jot a note for myself which clips are involved.


If you simple "join" them after removing the commercial you might get a "rude" jump from one scene to another.


Soooo, when I drag that clip onto the next one, referring to my notes, I choose to use the MERGE special effect there. The result is a VERY pleasing merge of the end of one clip to the beginning of the next. No sudden JOLT to your senses. More like they do it in Hollywood.


Just remember that most editors involve the use of a clip storage area where you can put your clips before combining them to make the movie.


This might be especially true for those of you doing "home" video. By copying only the wanted portions of your video to the clip list, you then have full creative control over how they are put together. Maybe you might like to have the video of clip one at the end of the movie?


I also have a "stock" bin of clips that I use often. One is a 720 x 480 black 1 second clip in mpeg-2 at the bit rate that I normally use with my video.


Sometimes rather than use a "merge" I insert that black one second and then merge do a fade in and out. Sometimes it's more appropriate as opposed to a merge.


Well there you go. Just a few ideas and reasons you should get used to "assembling" your clips to create your full movie. It's more of the standard way of doing it.


Also don't forget .. there IS sometimes problems with the completed mpeg if you just "cut" out clips and let the program re-join itself. I haven't investigated it but it does happen.


More later ... Rich


Post edit note. I corrected my syntax a little to avoid confusion. Where I said "save" to the clipboard I changed it to "copy" to the clipboard which is the more correct term. In Womble "saving" is the compiling of the finished product. "Copying" is just that. Copying the cut portion of the clip without any kind of "compiling".
 

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And now I'm one step further from being a newbie. . .


Thanks Rich!
 

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Womble tip # 1


If you have a big enough hard drive and fast enough processor, you can even open up multiple copies of Womble. I sometimes edit two movies at the same time. Warning .. ya gotta really pay attention to what you are doing. But then I'm usually running three computers at once and switching from one to the other.


In fact you can load more than one movie into one womble program's work area. Nice when you want to view two versions side by side and frame by frame.


Or when you have two movies (like home videos) and want to load both into the work area and "copy" selected portions from either one to the clip list to be finally compiled all together.


Open the Womble GUI to a full screen and select 1/4 view and you can load a few movies in at once. Sort of a big "mixer" for video.
 

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From the Womble GUI, drop down the "Tools" tab. Then open the "Options" button.


Among other things you will see in that "Options" window, a tab for "Video Encoder". There you can select how you want the encoder to work. You can put the emphasis on "quality" as your own default. This will make the encoder work harder to produce better quality video, but also slow the process down.


This is NOT just for when you may want to re-encode an entire video. (IMHO a waste of time) BUT remember Womble also does ENCODE those few frames where you either joined or added a special effect. Since you are only looking at a second or so at the most, it's best to leave it at the "quality" setting. You will notice this when you "Save" (compile) all the clips from the clip board. As it gets to a join or FX spot, the progress bar will hesitate a bit. I always leave it at high quality, low speed. You'll find the difference is subtle but there.
 

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When you are done editing, you will find all your clips still listed in the clip list. Delete them before closing. If you don't, the next time you run womble, those clips will appear.


A fast way is to highlight the first one and then just hold down the and hit the "X" button on your keyboard several times.


Also, if you DO delete them all and still have another movie to edit, you'll find it easier if you close Womble and Restart a new session. Even if you deleted all the clips if you add another movie without a fresh start, then the new clips will be auto numbered starting with one more than your previously edited movie.


Example .. finished editing movie #1 and deleted 8 clips. NO restart and load another movie. First clip for the new movie will be assigned to the name Clip 9. Deleting AND restarting Womble will zero the clip count.
 

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Last one today .. Did you know you can alter the audio when you save a movie WITHOUT having to re-encode the video?


This is handy when you are working with the pre-4000 ReplayTV mpegs that have 32 kHZ audio. You need 48 kHz to meet the DVD spec.


(note do NOT change any video parameters .. if you DO then BOTH the video and audio will be encoded from scratch .. waste of time)


After you've assembled your new movie click on the "Save" button. That's the icon that looks like a little red drum ?? A window will pop up and have video and audio buttons. Click on the audio only. Change it from 32 kHz to 48 kHz. Close the window and save the mpeg. You will find to fully re-encde just the audio of a one hour movie during your normal saving of the mpeg will only increase the over time by a minute or two. In my case it goes from 1.5 minutes to about 2.5 minutes. (I have a fast system)
 

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Rich, here's one for you...


Looking at the other discussion on the reprice thread about HDTV transport streams... Any idea how you save a transport stream?


I was looking throught the all the save clip options and the transport stream is greyed out.


Another interesting observation... What's "MPEG-VCR Edit Decision List" ? Is this a save for the items on the clipboard? The docs are a little confusing to me. (and no I didn't try it, currently looking at the HDTV transport stream)


-Jeff
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Jeff D
Rich, here's one for you...


Looking at the other discussion on the reprice thread about HDTV transport streams... Any idea how you save a transport stream?


I was looking throught the all the save clip options and the transport stream is greyed out.



Another interesting observation... What's "MPEG-VCR Edit Decision List" ? Is this a save for the items on the clipboard? The docs are a little confusing to me. (and no I didn't try it, currently looking at the HDTV transport stream)


-Jeff


That's strange. It's not greyed out here. If I load a standard mpeg-2 program stream into Womble, I do have the option to save as a "transport Stream". and when done it's got an extension of *.m2t


As for the edit decision list, as far as I can tell, it's just a text file with all the details of your edit session. Uses the same extension as when you save the editor project. *.wme Next time you do an edit, before closing the project save it and then take a look at the *.wme file with notepad. I "think" the difference between an edit decision list and the project editor saved, is the decision list only saves the clip information, whereas the project saves that and all the encoding information.


Never really did much with those things except to always save the current working project before I started a final edited mpeg save. (so if the thing goes crazy I can reload the editor project and all my cuts and pointers etc. will be retrieved. In earlier versions of Womble sometimes when you go to save your final mpeg, the thing would crash and you'd loose all the work that you did. So as a rule I always saved the project before the final compile (save). But I noticed with about version 1.13 and up that it doesn't seem to be doing that any more. Haven't had a lock up ina long time. Still old habits are hard to break and of course you KNOW the first time I DON'T save my work first ... it'll crash on me. :p
 

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Rich,


I had posted this query about audio editing in another thread and Heathriel gave some suggestions promptly, but still I seem to have the problem,


I am in the process of collecting the audio soundtracks of some of my RTV Mpegs edited in Womble ( these are not available commercially, especially the back ground scores and title music, by this great musician from India by name Ilaiyaraja...proud to be a die hard fan of this living legent of south indian music), after demuxing I am able to save the audio files as *.mpa ( it looks like they are saved as Mp2 files), these mp2 audio files play well on my winamp and other players, but the problem is when I try to burn an audio Cd using these files, all the programs so far have rejected them saying incompatible format, I tried Nero, Roxio.


I know technically this is Rtv MPEG based audio issue, if u can please help me, I would appreciate a lot, I searched for some kind of converters to turn this mp2 to mp3, was not successful


thanks in advance


Jingcha
 

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Get the Freeware program dbPowerAmp. Change the extension of the demuxed mpa audio file to mp2. Use dbPowerAmp to convert directly to mp3. I believe dbPowerAmp will even author your audio cds.

www.dbpoweramp.com


I first posted a way to do it with TMPGenc but remembered dbPowerAmp was easier and (also freeware)
 

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Jingcha, you can also use VirtualDubMod to extract wav files directly from your .mpgs. Open the .mpg in VirtualDubMod and go to Streams->View Streams, then click "Save WAV" to save the audio portion as a wav file.
 

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There are a couple of other cool apps you can use on the mpa file. One of my favorites and the best... besweet it's a command line tool, but there is a besweetGUI that can help. Check doom9.org download section for audio tools. This tool can convert between almost all formats, you may need specific add-on tools, but they are all free...


BTW Doom9.org is a great resource for many great tools.


One thing about spyzdope's option... make sure under the audio menu you choose to do full processing on the file unstead of direct stream copy. If you do direct stream copy you'll end up with the same thing.
 

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Oh, and thanks Rich. I don't know if you noticed... I had mentioned I was working with the HDTV TS, so that may have been a factor in the transport stream option being grayed out... ?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Rich A
In my case it goes from 1.5 minutes to about 2.5 minutes. (I have a fast system)
What makes a fast system, in Womble terms? Which makes the bigger difference, more RAM or more proc Hz? Assuming an ultra ATA-100 disk sys (non-RAID). I.e., 950Mhz P-III and 768 Mb RAM, what would you upgrade first?


BTW unlimited kudos for your "Womble For Dummies©" series in this thread. Maybe we should send you the savings from the original Womble price :D
 

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Hi, and thanks. No need for the "royalties" .. heh heh. The satisfaction derived from helping someone is enough for me. Promotes good karma, and over all well being. So thank YOU for letting me at least attempt to help.


I'd say the first bump in speed increase is going to be the processor. A faster disk would not help as much as a processor upgrade. A "second" disk would give you a little help just because when you are saving the mpeg having a different drive to save to, as opposed to the one your file resides on will help a little. Ie. you don't have to read and write to the same physical drive.


Memory above 512k isn't going to help unless like me you go for 2 or 3 GB. I often run a "RAM Disk" of 1.5 GB just to use as work space etc. This is used for anything where I won't go over 1.5 GB and will be doing disk intensive operations. (be warned, there are issues with some MS operating systems that cause a problem when trying to install that op. sys. in a machine with large amounts of RAM. Generally you have to install the op. system with 512 Mb of RAM and then after the successful install, upgrade the RAM to 1 or 2 GB (if your main board will accept it)


Here's the general rules I've found to be applicable.


If you do a lot of encoding (ie adding special effects, merges etc or just plain re-encoding) then the processor will be the hardest working thing.


If you just do editing or multiplexing etc. with little encoding needed, then disk access will be the telling factor.
 
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