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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.


I've seen many construction photographs of members home theaters, and all drywalls seem to be buily using wooden framing. Looking through an ad from our local DIY-market today, i saw them advertise aluminum framing for drywall placement.


Anyone know the pro's and con's of using wood vs. aluminum? Which one is preferred when going for an HT-room (sound isolation etc.)?


Thanks,

Den
 

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use wood-metal studs resonate

found out the hard way
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Rosconey,


Sorry you had to find out the hard way, so thanks a million. Come to think of it: I guess it's allways better to use solid materials to avoid resonance then, isn't it...


Den
 

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Let's make a distinction here, Den used the term 'Aluminum' whereas rosconey said metal. I've seen both, and there is a big difference. Years back we were remodeling some of our office space, all the walls were built with extremely ridgid and straight 'I-beam' shaped 'Aluminum studs'. More recently comercial construction in this area uses a (much cheaper) 'sheet metal 'C' shaped stud' that is much flimsier.


To which is being referred to in this case.


Bruce
 

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In my under-construction HT, I have to use metal framing -- it's being built in a wood-free zone (a basement with a history of termite issues). Can anyone suggest how best to insulate it so I don't get resonance issues?


THanks.
 

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You must insulate all joist cavities in walls adjacent to the theater. This is not only for transmission loss; but, to prevent the cavities themselves from becoming resonance cavities. To prevent ringing or other potential side effects of metal or aluminium framing, you must add mass directly to the framing. In your case, this cannot be a 1x2 or similar. You can use a higher gauge metal or, you can buy a bunch of old inner tubes, slice them into strips and glue the strips to both sides of the framing (not the sides that attach to the drywall, the two inside sides).
 

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use a lot of cross bracing-parts express has a sound dampening sheet that you might try,- cut and stick to the inside of the steel studs-how big is the area ,you might try the new plastic wood that they build decks with-its solid and wont like termites-also if your going on concrete walls useing hat stripps after you install drill a hole and fill cavity between it and wall with spray faom
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi all,


Brucer: you're right, i do mean the cheap sheet metal framing..


Dennis: Wouldn't filling up all cavities be just as important when using wood? How about small spaces between wall and framing, would you fill them up also and with what? Am i right in concluding from your answer that wood would be better than aluminum framing, or that at least you wouldn't have to worry about adding weight to the framing?


Thanks,

Den
 

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I didn't say weight. I said mass. Mass and weight are different. :)


You have to fill all the cavities anyway. You should also use fiberglass or rock wool between the framing and the exterior wall as well (prevents a chase for fire to climb the inside of the walls). Rockwool is far more common in your neck of the woods, Den, then it is here. You still need to add something directly to the metal studs to prevent their ringing like bells for Christmas. Yes, I'd use wood (I know it is the non-green thing to do).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Great advice,

Thanks all!!


Den
 
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