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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I just bought a Samsung Pn50B650 plasma, and built an HTPC with an i3 and bluray drive. I calibrated the TV as per CNET's reccomended settings, but I've heard that this is not the correct way to do it if I have an HTPC. My questions are:


1) Is the eye-one meter worth $159 to calibrate my new display or are the CNET settings good enough?


2) From what I've gathered, when people calibrate with an HTPC you set your tv to the defaults and adjust the PC's settings after that. Is this correct?


Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Servicetech571 /forum/post/18233286


Factory default is normally decent on most TV's these days. It's not like in the CRT days where they could be off quite a bit from the factory.

Depends on the brand and what you think "decent" means.


To the OP, you calibrate your display first and only change things on the HTPC if you can't get them correct on the TV. You will need to make sure the HTPC is set up correctly, too, i.e. sending the proper black/white levels, etc.
 

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It really comes down to your own level of anal-ness. (I say this with a disclaimer, as I am sure someone else will bark down my throat that only by having your TV set exactly the way Riddly Scott expects it to be set when he mastered Black Hawk Down will you ever be able to appreciate it for blah, blah, blah.)


The difference is between reference and preference, and the debate has logged a lot of threads here in the forums. Basically, do you believe that your TV should just look good to you, or that it should look exactly like the recording studio says it should? If you think the former is all that matters, I would say that a person of average intelligence, with workable eyes, can get their displays to the point that they are not missing anything too terribly significant without having to buy additional tools.


I have a couple of I1 products that I use to make sure my desktop monitor is accurate for still photography work, but that is primarily to ensure that the photos I see on screen look identical to the photos I see in print or that the photos sent to others (also with properly setup displays) will show similar results. I've never bothered to use them to try and calibrate or profile my movie/TV displays.


If you have a general understanding of what a proper picture should look like (no clipped whites, no clipped blacks, nobody with green or orange skin, etc) you can get very good results with a number of freebies found online (there are some good downloadable DVD calibrators here in the display calibration forum) that can get you a very well dialed in picture.


Now the general retort is usually something like but if you don't at least start with your display at reference levels, you'll never know what your display should look like to begin with, etc. etc. This is where your own personal level of anal-ness comes into play. If you get the display to where you think it looks good, and the various free/your-eyes-only calibration aids show that you are not vastly out of whack, is that good enough for you?


-Suntan
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. I have the AVE bluray coming in the mail today, and from what I understand I can at least do some basic calibration without a colormeter, such as crushing blacks. I'll give that a whirl first and if it's good enough to me, I'll stick with it.
 
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