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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have tested multiple great condition, fully functional projectors now on two different entry level screens, and they are all blurring, smearing, and losing all detail with motion. However, others who own the same projectors experience good motion with them. The reason I didn't suspect the screen before now is because it's been the same issue on two different screens, however, both of them are entry level screens, so I wonder if both could be the problem?

Here is the first one. Amazon.com: Abdtech Portable Outdoor Movie Screen, 120 inch 3D Projector Screen Frame Foldable Movie Screen for Projectors Enjoy Outdoor Film Movie Night with Carrying Bag for Indoor Outdoor Home Theater Camping: Home Audio & Theater. Here is a picture of its surface up close. The picture was actually taken to show the bad misconvergence of a projector I bought, but ignore that and you can still see that the surface is pretty textured.
Rectangle Font Parallel Tints and shades Pattern


Then the second screen, I don't have a picture of the material up close, but it is this screen, except with Cinewhite 1.1 gain material, not UHD-B. https://www.amazon.com/Elite-Screen...tand+elite+yardmaster+2&qid=1626755206&sr=8-1

Could these surfaces be creating a lot of extra motion blur/motion smear, etc, compared to a high end screen surface, when used with 1080p projectors? I'm thinking that in theory, a Stewart or Seymour screen will provide a clearer still image than an entry level screen, otherwise why would people pay much more for them? And if it provides a clearer still image, and projector "motion" is made up of 24 still images per second, then should it also provide a clearer moving image?

But that's just theorizing. I am wondering if anyone has prove this out in real life, or if it simply does not work that way that a better screen would have less motion blur than a worse screen?

My only other theory is, if it's not the quality of the screen, what about all the light reflecting from white screen surfaces onto completely white walls and ceiling? Could that create motion blur, or no?
 

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I have tested multiple great condition, fully functional projectors now on two different entry level screens, and they are all blurring, smearing, and losing all detail with motion. However, others who own the same projectors experience good motion with them. The reason I didn't suspect the screen before now is because it's been the same issue on two different screens, however, both of them are entry level screens, so I wonder if both could be the problem?

Here is the first one. Amazon.com: Abdtech Portable Outdoor Movie Screen, 120 inch 3D Projector Screen Frame Foldable Movie Screen for Projectors Enjoy Outdoor Film Movie Night with Carrying Bag for Indoor Outdoor Home Theater Camping: Home Audio & Theater. Here is a picture of its surface up close. The picture was actually taken to show the bad misconvergence of a projector I bought, but ignore that and you can still see that the surface is pretty textured. View attachment 3156246

Then the second screen, I don't have a picture of the material up close, but it is this screen, except with Cinewhite 1.1 gain material, not UHD-B. Amazon.com: Elite Screens Yard Master 2, 120-inch Outdoor Indoor Projector Screen 16:9, Fast Easy Snap On Set-up Freestanding Portable Movie Foldable Front Projection | US Based Company 2-YEAR WARRANTY, OMS120H2: Home Audio & Theater

Could these surfaces be creating a lot of extra motion blur/motion smear, etc, compared to a high end screen surface, when used with 1080p projectors? I'm thinking that in theory, a Stewart or Seymour screen will provide a clearer still image than an entry level screen, otherwise why would people pay much more for them? And if it provides a clearer still image, and projector "motion" is made up of 24 still images per second, then should it also provide a clearer moving image?

But that's just theorizing. I am wondering if anyone has prove this out in real life, or if it simply does not work that way that a better screen would have less motion blur than a worse screen?

My only other theory is, if it's not the quality of the screen, what about all the light reflecting from white screen surfaces onto completely white walls and ceiling? Could that create motion blur, or no?
No, you are still barking up the wrong tree. It's not the screen. Recall I posted in a different thread that I had my family members help me hold up a sheet and shine a moving image on it... We did that to help you on your motion questions.

We saw no motion issues in that experiment. I've just got a plain JVC RS420 projector and a silver ticket white screen.

They were pretty decent quality sheets.

The motion issues you're seeing are not related to the screen. It's more than likely related to the projector or your eyes.

-T
 

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I have tested multiple great condition, fully functional projectors now on two different entry level screens, and they are all blurring, smearing, and losing all detail with motion. However, others who own the same projectors experience good motion with them. The reason I didn't suspect the screen before now is because it's been the same issue on two different screens, however, both of them are entry level screens, so I wonder if both could be the problem?

Here is the first one. Amazon.com: Abdtech Portable Outdoor Movie Screen, 120 inch 3D Projector Screen Frame Foldable Movie Screen for Projectors Enjoy Outdoor Film Movie Night with Carrying Bag for Indoor Outdoor Home Theater Camping: Home Audio & Theater. Here is a picture of its surface up close. The picture was actually taken to show the bad misconvergence of a projector I bought, but ignore that and you can still see that the surface is pretty textured. View attachment 3156246

Then the second screen, I don't have a picture of the material up close, but it is this screen, except with Cinewhite 1.1 gain material, not UHD-B. Amazon.com: Elite Screens Yard Master 2, 120-inch Outdoor Indoor Projector Screen 16:9, Fast Easy Snap On Set-up Freestanding Portable Movie Foldable Front Projection | US Based Company 2-YEAR WARRANTY, OMS120H2: Home Audio & Theater

Could these surfaces be creating a lot of extra motion blur/motion smear, etc, compared to a high end screen surface, when used with 1080p projectors? I'm thinking that in theory, a Stewart or Seymour screen will provide a clearer still image than an entry level screen, otherwise why would people pay much more for them? And if it provides a clearer still image, and projector "motion" is made up of 24 still images per second, then should it also provide a clearer moving image?

But that's just theorizing. I am wondering if anyone has prove this out in real life, or if it simply does not work that way that a better screen would have less motion blur than a worse screen?

My only other theory is, if it's not the quality of the screen, what about all the light reflecting from white screen surfaces onto completely white walls and ceiling? Could that create motion blur, or no?
No the screen won't create motion blur. Also light reflected from the screen from walls back onto the screen is reflected instantly. It's moving at the speed of light. This is not something you can see frame by frame blurring the image.
 

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You do realize that your image is only as good as the source.. To think that a static surface used to reflect light would in anyway altering the image in motion, differently than statically, makes absolutely no logical sense. Now a low bit rate over compressed input from a Cable/Satellite/Fiber provider would certainly look bad.. Or maybe it's the power cord???
 

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You do realize that your image is only as good as the source.. To think that a static surface used to reflect light would in anyway altering the image in motion, differently than statically, makes absolutely no logical sense. Now a low bit rate over compressed input from a Cable/Satellite/Fiber provider would certainly look bad.. Or maybe it's the power cord???
His sources are 2 different bluray players. One being the PS4 as I recall. And multiple different bluray media.

He has 3 projectors. 2 bought used as I recall. One he had for many years. All DLP.

He is sensitive to motion per his other posts.

It's amazing how I remember all of this stuff. I was so knee deep in his posts trying to help him so I recall a lot of the information off the top of my head.

-T
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You do realize that your image is only as good as the source.. To think that a static surface used to reflect light would in anyway altering the image in motion, differently than statically, makes absolutely no logical sense.
But that's the question. 1. Will the static image look clearer on a Stewart screen than a cinewhite 1.1 screen? 2. If so, would this translate to motion also? If it's clearer with still images, and display "motion" is made up of still images, then maybe it will also be clearer with motion?

Maybe the title is confusing, where I say "motion, specifically." Maybe you are reading that like will it affect motion in a way it won't affect still images, but what I mean is, motion as opposed to contrast or other categories. I put "motion, specifically" because of course the high end screens must be better at something. They must retain more contrast, or have better uniformity, etc. So I was asking aside from those things, will the screen also present a clearer image in motion?
 

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I'm going to reiterate because it's possible the OP did not read the replies from me and markmon1.

Between my reply based on an actual test using a 400 thread count sheet (certainly that has to be lower quality than a projector screen), and markmon1, I am certain that OP has an answer to his question. Low quality screens are not going to affect the image of motion.

-T
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Would a Stewart or Seymour 1.0 gain white screen provide better image clarity, sharpness, and detail than a 1.0 gain or 1.1 gain white cinewhite material, when used with a 1080p projector? If so, is it a big difference?

I know they reproduce colors more accurately, and stuff like that, but what about image clarity and detail? If they do a significantly better job in that area, then my screen could be a factor in what I'm seeing.

I used to have an Elite grey screen, which I think cost maybe $700 or something, and it seemed pretty good. Now I have their 1.1 cinewhite material, but the screen was $150, their entry level portable model, so Im not sure if ithis just a lower quality material than their grey material I used to have, or is this material the same material they would use on their $700 equivalent white screen? Or even if it is, it could be a case where their grey screens are just better than their white screens, or who knows, maybe some people's eyes just like the motion better projected onto a grey background than white. I can't think of any reason why off the top of my head, but there are enough variables that haven't been studied that it's hard to rule things like that out until you have a chance to watch the same content from the same projector on two different screen surfaces the same size from the same distance. Which I dont have. I have some grey (well, silver) samples but they're too small to compare, especially when everything is so blown out in my room on the white material, but not as much on the silver grey ones. I don't the color has anything to do with it, but it could be the quality of the screen, or the texture of the 1.1 material, losing some clarity and detail both in still, and moving, images.
 

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I don't think you're going to get any more replies. The question has been asked and answered.

-T
 
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But that's the question. 1. Will the static image look clearer on a Stewart screen than a cinewhite 1.1 screen? 2. If so, would this translate to motion also? If it's clearer with still images, and display "motion" is made up of still images, then maybe it will also be clearer with motion?

Maybe the title is confusing, where I say "motion, specifically." Maybe you are reading that like will it affect motion in a way it won't affect still images, but what I mean is, motion as opposed to contrast or other categories. I put "motion, specifically" because of course the high end screens must be better at something. They must retain more contrast, or have better uniformity, etc. So I was asking aside from those things, will the screen also present a clearer image in motion?
The delta between a still image and a moving image is independent of the screen. So you can apply that delta to a screen that yields a super sharp image or one that is a bit blurred due to texture.

There's a slight difference in still image quality on a stewart screen vs a cheaper screen. For example, on my stewart screen I can throw up a pure white image and make out the 4K resolution pixel grid sharply. On some other screen samples I've had, you could not. The texture blurred it out. Doubt that any material will blur out a 1080p pixel grid, however. And sitting further back will eliminate the benefit of this level of detail.

Most likely screen won't matter for sharpness / motion for you.
 
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