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Discussion Starter #1
Well I'm under a strict budget for a sub right now since I just bought the TV, receiver, and speakers all in the last month. I ordered the Dayton 12" for now becuase I really don't want to wait until I finish paying off the TV to save for something better.


My question is since I will already have the box/amp would buying a better speaker and installing it into the dayton box down the road be a solution? The Dayton seems to drop off hard at about 35 - 30Hz. Would getting a better quality speaker change anything or is it the package as a whole the issue? If you think that is a good idea what speaker would you put in a Dayton 12" subwoofer? It just seems like that would be a lot cheaper than buying another whole package.


Thanks.
 

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Well, it depends whether it's the new dayton or the old dayton - we don't know how the new one will perform yet. (I've ordered two of them, so I'm crossing my fingers :D ). I've heard mixed things about where it actually drops off, too. Some people say 30-35, some say more like the rated 25.


And which one you're getting is probably going to have a bearing on what you want to put in it, because the boxes are different (front vs. downfiring).
 

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I'm sure some of that depends what it's sitting on, where it's positioned, etc. I imagine the floor surface has a lot of bearing, particularly with a downfiring sub.
 

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Even if you change the driver, the tune of the enclsoure will be the same, so you won't really get much deeper extension. That tuning point and enclsoure size has been optimized (hopefully) for that driver - by just plopping in a better driver, you may actually get worse overall performance. If you desire a better sub, you're best option is to wait and save up to get a better one or just build a better one.
 

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Just my .02... I had a Cadence box, broken driver. Called Parts Express for their recommendation. They suggested a driver which was an upgrade, being the only one they thought might match the performance of the original. Called Cadence who also makes nice car audio drivers. They nixed the idea. The drivers and amps on these budget subs are designed to work together within the enclosure. So I got a replacement XSub driver, works great to spec.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yea I kind of thought that it wouldn't help much. I'll get the Dayton for now and if I'm not happy with it I'll sell it and get something nicer.
 

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In addition to what Ron stated, chances are the Dayton sub does not have enough internal bracing. If you really want to see how well the Dayton would perform with another driver, you'd have to search for some of the speaker/sub modeling software - which is free. You would then utilize the box volume, port information and the specs of the driver to find out how the new "combo" would perform, theoretically.


I've done a driver replacement before for an old sub that I had. It was an Audiosource 15" subwoofer with 2 ports and a 150 watt (I believe) amplifier. I pulled out the old, crusty Audiosource driver and replaced it with a Dayton 15" DVD sub/driver. I experienced a night-and-day difference in performance with the newer driver. For $100, it was easily one of the best upgrades I had performed. Then again, while there was a great performance increase, it is possible that the Audiosource box and factory amp was holding back the potential of the Dayton DVD driver, which may have performed even better in a larger cabinet.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes but still you only had to spend $100 for night and day difference. I wish I knew more about all these test people perform on their HT with their computer.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SightSeeker1
I wish I knew more about all these test people perform on their HT with their computer.
It's actually easier that one might think. Start small. For example:


- A simple Radio Shack SPL meter and some downloaded sine waves can get you on the road for testing your subwoofer. You record the measurements of the sine waves played through your system (burned onto a CD) and record the measurements. You then apply the correction values for the sound meter. You can then enter the values into a spreadsheet (available free on the 'Net) and it will graph your response.


From there, you can move your sub around the room and see where the best readings occur. Or, the test could b performed to test one sub against another. Or, even to determine if your sub/room would benefit from some form of equalization.


- Taking it a step further, you can buy more precise microphones that take readings with free audio software (also available on the 'Net) and plot the readings in the software.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hey thanks. Starting to understand but what is this?


Quote:
Originally Posted by wje
You record the measurements of the sine waves played through your system (burned onto a CD) and record the measurements. You then apply the correction values for the sound meter. You can then enter the values into a spreadsheet (available free on the 'Net) and it will graph your response.
Do you just record the decibels at a certain area and keep moving the sub until it has the best readings from your seating position? Where can I get the tones?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Also is it something like you have tracks on the CD that play sounds at 80Hz then another at 40Hz all the way down and you record the readings on the meter then plot those into the computer?
 

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Pretty much. But there are test tones that go in 1 Hz increments even. (And if you want to do a full sweep up to say 100, that's a lot of values to write down.) :p
 

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-->SightSeeker1
Quote:
Thanks. Where do I download them? I'll get the SPL meter after the sub comes in.
I have 4 or 5 purchased test discs for both sub and speaker measuring.


1Hz spacing starting at 10Hz here, you want them this close to get a very accurate picture of what your sub is doing in room at your listening position.
http://www.realtraps.com/test-cd.htm


Some reading their also that you might find helpful.
 
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