AVS Forum banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Looking to upgrade from my 50" Plasma, and thinking about an entry level projector for a ~100" screen.

Currently sit about 10 feet away from TV, and would mount the projector between the speakers on the back wall (3rd pic).

This is a basement with very little ambient light, mostly used for movies, gaming, and sports (hockey).

How would you set up a projector in this space?





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,558 Posts
I would say you have a great room for a projector setup. If you want to work with the room colors walls and ceiling you could have a great room.

You can get great 1080p home theater projectors now new for 500 bucks. No reason not to give it a try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
How big is the white panel above the TV? I'd aim at using the area covered by that panel for my projection screen. What is the distance from the back (speaker) wall to the wall where the TV is mounted?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I would say you have a great room for a projector setup. If you want to work with the room colors walls and ceiling you could have a great room.

You can get great 1080p home theater projectors now new for 500 bucks. No reason not to give it a try.
Thanks for the reply! I would probably look for some black ceiling tiles from projector to screen, and definitely would plan on buying a fixed screen (any recommendations for a 100" screen?). What changes would you make to the room/wall colours?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
How big is the white panel above the TV? I'd aim at using the area covered by that panel for my projection screen. What is the distance from the back (speaker) wall to the wall where the TV is mounted?
The white panel above the tv is 42"x94", but I think it's way too high up to use as a screen. I would probably get a fixed screen to hang on that wall. Any recommendations for a 100" screen?

The distance from the back wall to the screen wall is 12'3". The main seating position is 10' from the TV. Looks like most projectors would be able to handle a 100" 16:9 display at that throw distance.

Since this photo was taken, I have removed the weird electric fireplace right of the TV, and widened the front towers, so there's more room than there appears to be in the photos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,712 Posts
I can't tell how far away from the screen the projector will be mounted.
Personally I would go with a 110 or 120" screen at your viewing distance but it is a matter of preference.
Typically first time projector owners go too small then upgrade to something larger.
The best low cost screen seems to be the Silver Ticket. Go with white not grey.


For a projector, reflected light from white walls and ceiling really impact contrast. Darkening the room colors would be the best bang for the buck upgrade.
Have fun. I went to projectors 8 years ago and haven't watched a direct view tv since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I can't tell how far away from the screen the projector will be mounted.
Personally I would go with a 110 or 120" screen at your viewing distance but it is a matter of preference.
Typically first time projector owners go too small then upgrade to something larger.
The best low cost screen seems to be the Silver Ticket. Go with white not grey.


For a projector, reflected light from white walls and ceiling really impact contrast. Darkening the room colors would be the best bang for the buck upgrade.
Have fun. I went to projectors 8 years ago and haven't watched a direct view tv since.
Thanks for the reply David!The projector would be mounted about 12'3" from the screen (not factoring in the size of the projector)

I am currently sitting 10 feet away from a 50" TV, so upgrading to 100" is a little overwhelming. From 10' away, would you still go up to 110"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
The white panel above the tv is 42"x94", but I think it's way too high up to use as a screen. I would probably get a fixed screen to hang on that wall. Any recommendations for a 100" screen?

The distance from the back wall to the screen wall is 12'3". The main seating position is 10' from the TV. Looks like most projectors would be able to handle a 100" 16:9 display at that throw distance.

Since this photo was taken, I have removed the weird electric fireplace right of the TV, and widened the front towers, so there's more room than there appears to be in the photos.
IMHO, in a room with a 7.5ft high ceiling, I'd want the top edge of the screen as close to the ceiling as possible. This will make the image easily viewable and allow viewers to walk under the projected light with minimal obstruction of the image. When you visit a movie theatre you'll notice that the screen is well above your seated position.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,837 Posts
When you visit a movie theatre you'll notice that the screen is well above your seated position.
Most properly designed theaters have the center seats hitting about the center of the screen for eye level.

Few theaters have it up high or down low.

But, really the typical setup has the eyes falling about 1/3 to 1/2 way up from the bottom of the screen, so there is room to have it a bit higher.

TYPICAL SCREEN SIZE: About 10" to 12" of diagonal for each FOOT of viewing distance. 100" to 120" diagonal is typical.

It is recommended you get the projector first, then decide upon a screen size. Just throw a white sheet up on the wall for a bit and try out 100" to 120" or larger/smaller and see what you like best. Don't let us decide for you based upon our own preferences. You can also try different heights.

It does look like you can ceiling mount, and maybe bring it a few inches closer if needed if you want to go smaller. Really, you have about 11' or 10.5' lens to screen to work with.

IMO - This is an ideal setup for the BenQ HT2050a.

From 10.5' lens to screen, it can give you an image diagonal between 96" and 125" diagonal. Right what you are looking for.

http://www.projectorcentral.com/BenQ-HT2050A-projection-calculator-pro.htm

The HT1070A is a bit cheaper, and may be a solid option, but from that throw distance will be a bit smaller. You will need a few extra inches of throw distance to hit 110" diagonal...
http://www.projectorcentral.com/BenQ-HT1070A-projection-calculator-pro.htm

I would go with the HT2050A and call it done.

Yes, painting all surfaces 'darker' would be recommended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,558 Posts
Thanks for the reply! I would probably look for some black ceiling tiles from projector to screen, and definitely would plan on buying a fixed screen (any recommendations for a 100" screen?). What changes would you make to the room/wall colours?
Black tiles are easy to do and can be painted and replaced later if you need to go back to white. They also make running wires and cables a snap. He walls I like the trim but would paint the upper half a darker color. And if it were me I would take the wall and make it all flat and paint the wall with flat paint to use as a screen while figuring out what size you want. I sit 8 foot from a 110” max 16:9 screen size I then use zoom to go smaller when required. Keep in mind scope movies wont be as tall as your screen and some movies expand to IMAX. Projectors are different than TV as you can easily change the size as you like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
Most properly designed theaters have the center seats hitting about the center of the screen for eye level.

Few theaters have it up high or down low.

But, really the typical setup has the eyes falling about 1/3 to 1/2 way up from the bottom of the screen, so there is room to have it a bit higher.
Yes, that's true. In my defence I always sit very close to the screen (3rd-5th row back) and I simply forgot about that...:eek: I always express wonder at why people go to a cinema and then sit so far back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,558 Posts
The BenQ HT2050A is a very nice entry level projector and if you want to save $250 the Viewsonic Pro7827HD is a very similar projector with very similar features. You could call it done and still have money left for the screen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,837 Posts
...if you want to save $250 the Viewsonic Pro7827HD...
I really hate Viewsonic. I've had some issues with them in years past.

But, if I'm to be honest, they very well could have resolved those issues and may be delivering much better product. I used to have the same complaint about BenQ who I happily support these days. So, what do I know?

At that price ($500) get the Viewsonic, then use the $250 to get a Silver Ticket screen from Amazon to go along with it. Seems like the right way to go! Throw distance is almost identical to the BenQ, and if I were to guess, I'm thinking Viewsonic saw what BenQ delivered and said "HEY! We can copy that!" - and they did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,558 Posts
I really hate Viewsonic. I've had some issues with them in years past.

But, if I'm to be honest, they very well could have resolved those issues and may be delivering much better product. I used to have the same complaint about BenQ who I happily support these days. So, what do I know?

At that price ($500) get the Viewsonic, then use the $250 to get a Silver Ticket screen from Amazon to go along with it. Seems like the right way to go! Throw distance is almost identical to the BenQ, and if I were to guess, I'm thinking Viewsonic saw what BenQ delivered and said "HEY! We can copy that!" - and they did.
They were smart enough to copy it and then priced it $100 higher and never sold many For 3 years. They waited around until the one they copied dropped in price and then matched the price.

This one is my second Viewsonic and I haven’t had anything bad to say about ether one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,712 Posts
Most properly designed theaters have the center seats hitting about the center of the screen for eye level.

Few theaters have it up high or down low.

But, really the typical setup has the eyes falling about 1/3 to 1/2 way up from the bottom of the screen, so there is room to have it a bit higher.

TYPICAL SCREEN SIZE: About 10" to 12" of diagonal for each FOOT of viewing distance. 100" to 120" diagonal is typical.

It is recommended you get the projector first, then decide upon a screen size. Just throw a white sheet up on the wall for a bit and try out 100" to 120" or larger/smaller and see what you like best. Don't let us decide for you based upon our own preferences. You can also try different heights.

It does look like you can ceiling mount, and maybe bring it a few inches closer if needed if you want to go smaller. Really, you have about 11' or 10.5' lens to screen to work with.

IMO - This is an ideal setup for the BenQ HT2050a.

From 10.5' lens to screen, it can give you an image diagonal between 96" and 125" diagonal. Right what you are looking for.

http://www.projectorcentral.com/BenQ-HT2050A-projection-calculator-pro.htm

The HT1070A is a bit cheaper, and may be a solid option, but from that throw distance will be a bit smaller. You will need a few extra inches of throw distance to hit 110" diagonal...
http://www.projectorcentral.com/BenQ-HT1070A-projection-calculator-pro.htm

I would go with the HT2050A and call it done.

Yes, painting all surfaces 'darker' would be recommended.
Ditto.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Most properly designed theaters have the center seats hitting about the center of the screen for eye level.

Few theaters have it up high or down low.

But, really the typical setup has the eyes falling about 1/3 to 1/2 way up from the bottom of the screen, so there is room to have it a bit higher.

TYPICAL SCREEN SIZE: About 10" to 12" of diagonal for each FOOT of viewing distance. 100" to 120" diagonal is typical.

It is recommended you get the projector first, then decide upon a screen size. Just throw a white sheet up on the wall for a bit and try out 100" to 120" or larger/smaller and see what you like best. Don't let us decide for you based upon our own preferences. You can also try different heights.

It does look like you can ceiling mount, and maybe bring it a few inches closer if needed if you want to go smaller. Really, you have about 11' or 10.5' lens to screen to work with.

IMO - This is an ideal setup for the BenQ HT2050a.

From 10.5' lens to screen, it can give you an image diagonal between 96" and 125" diagonal. Right what you are looking for.

http://www.projectorcentral.com/BenQ-HT2050A-projection-calculator-pro.htm

The HT1070A is a bit cheaper, and may be a solid option, but from that throw distance will be a bit smaller. You will need a few extra inches of throw distance to hit 110" diagonal...
http://www.projectorcentral.com/BenQ-HT1070A-projection-calculator-pro.htm

I would go with the HT2050A and call it done.

Yes, painting all surfaces 'darker' would be recommended.
This is a great reply, thank you! I've actually been looking at the BenQ 2050 and the Epson HC2100. I'm a little weary of a DLP projector, due to the rainbow effect. We had a DLP style rear projection TV, and I always noticed the rainbows. Of course, the only way to know would be to view one.

Does anyone have experience with both projectors?

Thanks to all the replies, I'm starting to get excited about a theatre experience in my basement. Now to get the wife excited too.. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,337 Posts
The sub-$1000 DLPs, for the most part, are noticeably better than the cheap Epsons.

Rainbows vary, and are personal. On mine, a Vivitek H1186, I don't see them at all. So get one (with return privileges) and try it out.

It really helps to darken the room nearest the screen. You don't have to darken the whole room, just the 5-6 feet closest to the screen. That room could use some sound absorption too, so the best results would be dark absorption throughout that 5-6 foot space.

Seeing as you have floor-based speakers, you might want to place the screen as low as possible given your PJ mounting limitations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
IMHO, in a room with a 7.5ft high ceiling, I'd want the top edge of the screen as close to the ceiling as possible. This will make the image easily viewable and allow viewers to walk under the projected light with minimal obstruction of the image. When you visit a movie theatre you'll notice that the screen is well above your seated position.
No its not , you are looking mostly down at the screen in a theatre. I have somewhat the same clearance , if you have your screen to high in that room, you will exp. front row neck syndrome. If i were you I would place the screen just high enough to clear ever ones head in the seated position. when looking straight from the seated positions, your eyes should be at centre of screen or higher ,looking down not up. This has been my exp. might not work for all. Hw ever if I were you,I would consider a large screen TV 75"+,
when you factor all the components and cost of setting up a theatre in a room thats not really campatible, IMO. It sounds cool , looks cool, but not the best bang for you buck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
No its not , you are looking mostly down at the screen in a theatre. I have somewhat the same clearance , if you have your screen to high in that room, you will exp. front row neck syndrome. If i were you I would place the screen just high enough to clear ever ones head in the seated position. when looking straight from the seated positions, your eyes should be at centre of screen or higher ,looking down not up. This has been my exp. might not work for all. Hw ever if I were you,I would consider a large screen TV 75"+,
when you factor all the components and cost of setting up a theatre in a room thats not really campatible, IMO. It sounds cool , looks cool, but not the best bang for you buck.
As long as the neck is supported via suitable reclining seating it won't be a problem. Additionally, in a room with low ceilings, the projector will have to be placed very low, if the image is low, and then the problems of clearance under the PJ and it's closer proximity to the viewers becomes a problem. Anyone who stands will also obstruct the light path from the PJ.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,587 Posts
This is a great reply, thank you! I've actually been looking at the BenQ 2050 and the Epson HC2100. I'm a little weary of a DLP projector, due to the rainbow effect. We had a DLP style rear projection TV, and I always noticed the rainbows. Of course, the only way to know would be to view one.

Does anyone have experience with both projectors?

Thanks to all the replies, I'm starting to get excited about a theatre experience in my basement. Now to get the wife excited too.. ;)
If you're worried about rainbows you may want to look at the Sony HW45ES. It's going to be a bit pricier, but offers a noticeably better picture than the entry level DLPs, and very flexible placement.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top