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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have finally spent some time with my X1 and I am very satisfied with the picture quality.


Last night was my first time actually watching a television program and the image looked better, in some ways, than a DVD. I am projecting onto blackout cloth if that matters.


I have my VCR hooked up to the X1 via the composite signal which I know is as lo-res as you can get. While watching Survivor, scenery in the background was pretty murky and I attribute that to the composite signal. However, close up shots of people, builidings, beaches and the like featured highly saturated colors and great contrast. Only at the dark setting of the tribal council did I notice some detail getting lost in the shadows.


After survivor, I popped in The Fellowship of the Ring and went to the chapter where Gandolph fights the fire demon. The image was definitely much more crisp than the tv signal (I am using component to VESA), but the contrast appeared to be not as good. A lot of the image looked darker than I would have liked and some of the darker scenes in Godzilla were similar. Overall, I am still absolutely pleased so I am not complaining.


Since both of these movies relied heavily on CG, could that be a contributing factor? How about the high compression ratio inherent in MPEG2 encoding? Lastly, my room has all white walls and I will buy a few black bed sheets to cover them so maybe that will help.


Sorry for the long post.


Greg Matty


P.S. I can't wait to watch after getting Lasik performed in two hours. ;)
 

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Forgive me if this is already obvious, but just in case...


I believe the user settings (brightness, contrast, etc) are set on a per input basis. Hence, any configuration settings you tweak for composite are not applied to any component/VGA input signals. Furthermore, some settings (like Picture) do not apply for different inputs (replaced with individual RGB settings using the VGA port). Could the difference in performance simply be attributed to different calibrations?


Dave
 

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I use different contrast & brightness settings for different sources on my X1. I have one setting for regular & sat TV, one for HDTV, and one for DVDs. I have found you need to tweak the X1 for each source you use. Try that, and save each setting as a "user setting". I just toggle between the settings depending on what I'm watching.


mike


PS: I run all my sources through the VGA input. Also, you might check your DVD player--on many of them, there are black level and other adjustments you can make.
 

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I'll second the 'different sources have their own settings' post above. DVD & SD-DirecTV are both feed via s-video, but have different calibration settings stored. The DVD was set using a calibration disk. The SD-DirecTV was set using the color bars from VH-1 during their "Sign Off" period. HDTV via VGA has so far only been 'eyeballed' as I haven't found any color bars on my OTA stations. I might suggest that to one of the local stations' engineers for a late night spot. No HD-DirecTV for me so far.
 

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LOTR is a very dark movie with attenuated colors. TV programs, on the other hand, are often very brightly lit with very saturated colors.


Try the latest DVD of "Singin' in the Rain" and see how that compares to TV on your X1. Go to the final "Broadway" ballet on the film, which has highly saturated colors as well as excellent resolution.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Greg Matty
I am projecting onto blackout cloth if that matters.
What is your definition of "blackout cloth"? Could you be more specific about what you are using?
 

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1. Like other have said, you're comaring apples to oranges when you compared a bright close up from SDTV to a dark movie scene with a lot of details. Try Monster Inc. If it doesn't look good then there is really a problem.


2. Have you done any tweaking at all using VE or AVIA?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Dean Martin
The X1 has a line doubler so maybe in some ways it is better. Try your DVD in the component to S video and maybe IT will improve too.
Yeah, if you don't have a decent DVD player, your progressive signal via VGA may be the issue. Try Dean's suggestion or get a decent player.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the replies. The Lasik went well but now I see screendoors. :)


I did not say that broadcast tv looked better than a DVD in all situations. Only that saturation looked better and contrast ratio. The DVD is MUCH sharper.


I have tweaked the settings to some extent, but that will need more time. Also the VGA input does not allow for color or tint correction. I do that with my Toshiba DVD player. It is the SD4800 progressive scan model. I paid around $200 for it last summer. I have not tried the AVIA or other calibration software that was mentioned. I will try to find those today at a retailer.


I thought blackout cloth was pretty universal and I don't have much else to give other than I went to a fabric store and bought eight feet of the stuff to make my screen. It is a heavy bright white fabric. Certainly not ideal for viewing compared to a $1,000 screen, but any shortcomings should affect both tv and DVD. It will be 76 inches wide for all material and about 84 diagonal for 16:9.


I will rent Monsters Inc today and see what I think. I will also try to find a movie set in broad daylight which should make a better comparison to brightly lit tv.


Any other comments on the white walls I have yet to cover up? That will happen today and I will give it the final acid test this evening.


Thanks for checking back. As mentioned, I am very happy with this unit and I am not complaining. I just want to make sure I am getting all that I can out of it.


Greg Matty
 
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