AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there any way to play XBOX on my Sony 61" rear projection without risking screen burn?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
Uh yes, just play regularly. Screen burn is less of a concern when playing at 480p because the entire screen is constantly being refreshed, and there are VERY few static images on the Xbox. Do you watch TV on the RPTV? That has a MUCH higher chance of screen burn than using your X-Box does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,723 Posts
Greetings


No ... if you play you, you risk ...


Keep contrast down ... and the less you play in 16x9 mode the better.


Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by Michael TLV
Greetings


No ... if you play you, you risk ...


Keep contrast down ... and the less you play in 16x9 mode the better.


Regards
Mike,


I don't understand the above comment. If I bought a 16:9 tv and the XBOX is configured to output a widescreen image why would that be more harmful than a 4:3 signal? By the way I've enjoyed learning from you in the many forums that you post in. Thanks!!


Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,723 Posts
Greetings


In the long run, the 16:9 mode on a 4:3 TV set will result in uneven crt wear ... I've seen too much of this and it even started to occur on my 4:3 61" too ... from the 16:9 HDTV mode after 18 months of use ... (5% of the time and low contrast )


Scared me ... so I stopped doing it completely and got a 16:9 set dedicated to HDTV material.


Aside from that ... some video games are presented in a windowboxed format which is pretty bad for the TV even if the game itself has no static images. The windowbox is ever present.


Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
I play games on Xbox on my HDTV all the time. There is not "letterboxing" of the games. All the games take up the entire screen area. You can specify in the setup what the exact specs are of your television (such as whether you want to display as 16:9, 4:3, or 4:3 letterboxed).


Also, I'm not sure how progressive scan lessens the risk of burn in. With interlaced doesn't every pixel only display every other frame update? And I can tell you from experience - the Xbox does have static graphics. Almost every game out has some sort of static display on the screen like a health bar or a score board (I'm less sure of this as it relates to sports games as I do not play them).


Generally speaking, to reduce the risk:


Turn down brightness

Vary your gaming habits (alternate games)

Do not leave the game on pause (without turning off the TV)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,710 Posts
There are two major reasons why "burn in" has become such a major issue in terms of Rear Projections TV's.



One of the reasons is the advent of ESPN News and CNN/SI. Sports Bars and Pizza Parlors with big screen tv's would leave their big screens on all day long with the contrast in torch mode and either ESPN News or CNN/SI on the screen. Both of these channels have a constant scoreboard running on the bottom of the screen, and over time this got burnt into the CRT's and left a permanent outline of that scoreboard. Sets were returned and replaced, until the manufacturers discovered that it was a case of these new cable channels being left on all day with their little tickers running across the screen.


The second reason is the advent of video games as baby sitters. Upper middle class parents would let their little kids play video games on the big screen for hours on end, because it would keep them glued to the screen and acted as some kind of interactive day care. Usually, these little kids would play the same Mario game over and over and over, and the same health meters and indicators would be on the screen for hours. Also these little kids would put the game on pause, go outside and play for a couple of hours and then come back and return to their game. After extended use like this, of course burn in would eventually occur.


So Manufacturers got hip to both situations and started putting disclaimers in their Owners Manuals to let people know that "burn in" wasn't covered under their warranties.


Of course this was done mostly to cover their behinds, from the rare situation where the exact same image was left on the screen for extremely long periods of time, day after day after day.


The key to playing games on your Rear Projection, is to not have your contrast in "Torch Mode", and to limit your gaming sessions to two hours or less, at any given time. Mix in some regular TV, and don't leave your games on pause for extended periods without changing the inputs on your TV or simply turning it off. If you have a widescreen, make sure that you use a Zoom or Stretch mode to fill the entire screen to avoid uneven wear.


It's much harder to burn an image into your CRT than most folks would have you believe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,404 Posts
XBOX does have a builtin feature that shuts it off after a period of non-use to help prevent burn-in.


So far I have seen no indications of burn in however I only play one or two hrs at a time and all the games I have are full screen. I also use the componet in from the XBOX not sure if that makes a big difference but might.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by Socio
XBOX does have a builtin feature that shuts it off after a period of non-use to help prevent burn-in.
Yeah after 8 hours!:eek: After that long what is the point?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
A few questions on this topic


I am considering purchasing the new JVC 48" 16:9 television mentioned in the posts below. I plan to also buy an XBOX for use with this televsion.

I asked the folks at Best Buy about CRT burn in with using an XBOX, the reply was "just don't play for more than 1 to 2 hours at a time, and don't leave the game console on pause with the TV on."

I took this in, but still have addtional questions.


1. As this is a 16:9 TV, do I face the same issues with burn in as mentioned by Michael in reference to the 4:3 owners concerning letter boxing and such? Again, I am willing to be smart here(hey, 1400 is a bargain for the TV, but still quite a bit of cash to me) So I plan on making intelligent choices when playing XBOX. I want to find out if I might be better off with a tube 16:9 if I plan to play XBOX more than 10 or 15 hours a week.


2. One post mentions selecting the output of the XBOX between 16:9, 4:3, or 4:3 letter boxed. I am assuming I would select 16:9 to match the aspect ratio of my televsion. Is there any danger to the CRT's by doing so (please bear with me here, I am new to the fourm)


3. I agree XBOX games probably do have static items on the screen. Again, is limiting my playing to 1 or two hours at a time a safe way to eliminate the risk of burn in, or is this overkill in terms of "preventive" playing?



My major concerns are not screwing up my investment by over playing my XBOX on this television. If I am better off buying a tube 16:9 to avoid this issue altogether, please let me know. The JVC is nice, but again, I want to be able to ENJOY the TV without constantly monitoring my watch and figuring out how many hours I have logged on the XBOX in one sitting.


Thanks in advance for any info


SJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by SJ1272
A few questions on this topic


I am considering purchasing the new JVC 48" 16:9 television mentioned in the posts below. I plan to also buy an XBOX for use with this televsion.

I asked the folks at Best Buy about CRT burn in with using an XBOX, the reply was "just don't play for more than 1 to 2 hours at a time, and don't leave the game console on pause with the TV on."

I took this in, but still have addtional questions.


1. As this is a 16:9 TV, do I face the same issues with burn in as mentioned by Michael in reference to the 4:3 owners concerning letter boxing and such? Again, I am willing to be smart here(hey, 1400 is a bargain for the TV, but still quite a bit of cash to me) So I plan on making intelligent choices when playing XBOX. I want to find out if I might be better off with a tube 16:9 if I plan to play XBOX more than 10 or 15 hours a week.


2. One post mentions selecting the output of the XBOX between 16:9, 4:3, or 4:3 letter boxed. I am assuming I would select 16:9 to match the aspect ratio of my televsion. Is there any danger to the CRT's by doing so (please bear with me here, I am new to the fourm)


3. I agree XBOX games probably do have static items on the screen. Again, is limiting my playing to 1 or two hours at a time a safe way to eliminate the risk of burn in, or is this overkill in terms of "preventive" playing?



My major concerns are not screwing up my investment by over playing my XBOX on this television. If I am better off buying a tube 16:9 to avoid this issue altogether, please let me know. The JVC is nice, but again, I want to be able to ENJOY the TV without constantly monitoring my watch and figuring out how many hours I have logged on the XBOX in one sitting.


Thanks in advance for any info


SJ
Ditto what he just asked.

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
quote:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Originally posted by Socio

XBOX does have a builtin feature that shuts it off after a period of non-use to help prevent burn-in.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Quote:
Originally posted by ragedogg69



Yeah after 8 hours!:eek: After that long what is the point?
I think this is adjustable in the dashboard settings.:rolleyes:But I agree after 8 hrs it wouldnt be pretty. If I have to pause a game for a long time I would just change the input to something else or turn the TV off...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,000 Posts
....some guy tells me that he left his xbox on "all day" on his uncle's tv set and no burn in arrived.


Either his contrast is 0->2 or he's lying to make me look bad because I was dissing his hdtv choice and told him to be careful when playing games.


-ELmO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,119 Posts
I was incorrect. The auto off is six hours and cannot be adjusted. It can only be turned on and off. (Page 11 of the XBOX user manual.):)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,404 Posts
I ask the sales person at Circut City about XBox burn in and he said that the Xbox is just a streamlined computer. He said the screen refreshs just like your monitor screen at (60hz refresh rate he thinks). He said you don't get burn in on your computer because of that and you won't get burn in on your TV either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Quote:
I ask the sales person at Circut City about XBox burn in and he said that the Xbox is just a streamlined computer. He said the screen refreshs just like your monitor screen at (60hz refresh rate he thinks). He said you don't get burn in on your computer because of that and you won't get burn in on your TV either.
Not to be too critical of you Circuit City sales person, but I wouldn't listen to him. Its like getting advice on your new Ferrari from a Ford dealer (not to insult Ford dealers :) ). A computer monitor is a CRT tube not a RPTV. Any and all games systems WILL burn your screen if left on for too long even if your contrast is turned down.


Please practice "Save RPTV console gaming".

1) Turn down your contrast/Brightness

2) Play for a MAX of 1 or 2 hours at a time.

3) Adjust your Console or TV aspect Ratio so that the entire screen is filled


If you follow these simple rules you should'nt have any problems.


J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by Socio
I ask the sales person at Circut City about XBox burn in and he said that the Xbox is just a streamlined computer. He said the screen refreshs just like your monitor screen at (60hz refresh rate he thinks). He said you don't get burn in on your computer because of that and you won't get burn in on your TV either.
Go back and ask this sales person why screen savers were invented. CRT computer monitors can have patterns burned-in on them, just like CRT televisions. Before screen-savers, it was quite common to have very noticeable burn-in on computer monitors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
yeah, CRT displays (Direct View) experience burn-in the same as RPTV's. Being a former salesperson at Best Buy, dont really listen to most of them unless they provide logical explanations. The advice about playing 1-2 hours a day is a bit excessive IMHO. As long as the contrast/brightness is properly calibrated you should be fine for 4 hours. I'm an avid gamer, and I say enjoy. If you are partially conscious of what's going on, expect no burn in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Actually, I'm going to have to go ahead and disagree from a functional point of view. While CRT displays may eventually experience burn in, and definitely have in the past, any decent computer monitor is pretty much immune to the effect. While it may happen eventually, it will not happen during the lifespan of the monitor. Something else is going to break first.


I am taking this point of view based on personal experience. I do not use screensavers. I never turn off my machine. I have multiple static graphics that have not moved (my desktop) in over 2 years. I have never personally seen burn-in occur. I would think that if anyone were going to see burn-in on a computer monitor, it would be me. I think the CRTs made for computer monitors have pretty much been practically immune to burn-in since resolutions hit SVGA. I think this happened when monitors started supporting 32 bit color (which may or may not be related to the overcoming of the burn-in problem).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
CRT burn-in has been virtually eliminated, and not be screensavers, as Midnite just said. The word "burn" would seem to be the key as technology has advanced and *direct-view* tubes just don't burn like they used to. I am in the same situation as Midnite where I will leave my monitor on for up to days at times (when I just don't visit the computer, or if I'm just leaving it on to keep up with e-mail and the like while running a server) and it just doesn't burn. The same (mostly) appiles to direct-view TVs and HDTVs (probably even more the latter).


The thing to remember about RPTVs is that the CRT(s) generating the picture are doing so *indirectly* (hence, direct-view is the phrase used in conjunction with "regular" tube TVs). They are going to tend, even at lower contrast/brightness settings, to be running "hotter" than a direct-view so that the reflected image is bright enough for viewing. This increases the risk of burn-in with static images, and it is why game companies advise in their instructions not to use their consoles with a rear-projection set.


That being said, you CAN play video games and you can do so safely. Play your game for an hour or two then walk away for a few minutes (with the television off or on another input); after those few minutes just come back and enjoy the game again - lather, rinse and repeat. Given appropriate calibration (turning down the contrast/brightness/etc., ideally to conform to the adjustments made with Video Essentials or a similar calibration DVD), this *will* prevent burn-in. I played a LOT of Playstation on my Toshiba widescreen (TW40H80) a few years back and I never had a problem; again, because I was careful about leaving it going for too long and because I had calibrated the set (ah, our first viewing of Starship Troopers was beautiful, even on that old NTSC widescreen :)). Oh yes, and since the games were 4:3 I often used the POP (picture outside picture) option to have TV and video game side by side, which I would periodically swap, usually during commercials. :)


BTW- The type of signal (480i, 480p, 1080i, etc.) has *nothing* to do with the burn-in - Widescreen games (or movies, for that matter) on a 4:3 RPTV can make a difference, but given a decent balance of gaming versus TV, you shouldn't have a problem. Of course, if you're using the TV exclusively for gaming, you should definitely go with a direct-view, just like if you are mostly watching DVDs or widescreen content you should go with a 16:9.


As has already been pointed out, "regular" TV (CNN, ESPN and the like) can burn in the same as a video game. Given the right precautions, you will be able to play ALMOST as much X-Box (or Playstation2 or Gamecube) you want.


-Aaron


Disclaimer: Given that anything is possible, the author makes no warrantes, explicit or implied, as to the accuracy of the above recommendations being applied in individual cases. Ergo, don't send any repair/replacement bills to me. :D
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top