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Is it worth it to get XLR over RCA? I just bought some but I realized my Subwoofer does not support XLR so when I turned on my preamp bass came out of the subwoofer and no sound from speakers. I'm using XLR with my speaker connections but not my sub. I'm using RCA with my sub. So is there a way to make them work together?


Also I have some RCA MIT terminator 3 and wireworld cables that i use for my 5 speakers and a mit terminator i use for my subwoofer My new XLR are AudioArt.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by riiaku /forum/post/16848174


I'm using Integra DTC-9.8 and an XPA-5 AMP. There are these switches on the back of the amp for each channel saying balanced and unbalanced, what does that do?

It probably selects the configuration for the input. Set them correctly for the particular input cable in use.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by riiaku /forum/post/16848205


what do you mean? How would i know what is what? Where would i find that info? What is balanced versus unbalanced?

XLR is the connector for balanced and RCA is the connector for unbalanced.
 

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These audio art cables change the sound literally, less bass delivery, less punchier, but really smooth bass, not boomy, much different from my RCA MIT Terminators. Everything sounds more clear, and precise, you can hear individual instruments more, you get really involved in the music, and just listen instead of daydreaming. A great song that you can use to tell the difference between equipment and cables is Nine Inch Nails, Album: SLIP, Song: Head Down. Its an insane bass excursion. Constantly changing. I think i prefer my MITs.
 

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RCA connections are always "unbalanced" That is, the signal hot is a single conductor referenced to the ground connection.


"Balanced" connections are designed where there are 2 signal conductors twisted together and they do not reference ground. Some amps have what is called a differential input where there is a + input and a - input to the IC (preamp). This is internal and there is no marking to that effect on the outside. This is used almost exclusively in the pro sound recording and re- enforcement industry. The other "balanced" format is where a transformer is at the input signal and another one is in the preamp input. Lo impedance microphones and direct boxes use this.


The reason for a balanced line is that noise induced on a single wire is cancelled out by the other wire when twisted together. The use of balanced lines also allows for a much longer distance between signal and amp.


If an XLR connector is used but the wiring and signal path are just single ended as in an RCA, then there is no improvement or greater cable length achieved simply by using the XLR cables. The only positive change is that XLRs lock in place.


To make an XLR to RCA adapter cable, the ground (shield) is soldered to pins 1 and 3. The center conductor is soldered to pin 2.


The data sheet for your equipment will say "transformer coupled" or "differential inputs" are included. How you connect it all together and the overall quality will depend on that information.


You can convert an unbalanced signal (RCA) to Balanced (XLR) and back but to do it correctly requires a a balancing transformer on each end.
 

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Quote:
The other "balanced" format is where a transformer is at the input signal and another one is in the preamp input.

A center tapped transformer or a differential op-amp can be used and can me mixed and matched.

Quote:
The reason for a balanced line is that noise induced on a single wire is cancelled out by the other wire when twisted together.


This is common misunderstanding. The twisted wires do not cancel out induced noise, the differential receiver (transformer or op-amp) does this. The wires are twisted to ensure that noise is induced equally into both conductors.

Quote:
You can convert an unbalanced signal (RCA) to Balanced (XLR) and back but to do it correctly requires a a balancing transformer on each end.

...or a simple and inexpensive op-amp.
 

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With many lousy experiences over many years being stuck with mixers that have differential amps and the hours spent trying to get rid of all kinds of noise, and induced signals in lines connected to differential amps, I absolutely will NOT ever use a non-transformer equipped mixer. Diff opamps are a PITA. Those of us who use large scale mixers and amp racks will not succumb to needless problems due to a no transformer design.


Trust me. I am, aware of the operation of balanced lines. You are correct in that many assume that merely having a twisted pair cable yet not utilizing a truly balanced input stage will not make any difference.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by riiaku /forum/post/16848266


These audio art cables change the sound literally, less bass delivery, less punchier, but really smooth bass, not boomy, much different from my RCA MIT Terminators. Everything sounds more clear, and precise, you can hear individual instruments more, you get really involved in the music, and just listen instead of daydreaming. A great song that you can use to tell the difference between equipment and cables is Nine Inch Nails, Album: SLIP, Song: Head Down. Its an insane bass excursion. Constantly changing. I think i prefer my MITs.

A cable would need some sort of series capacitance to reduce bass frequencies, so that's not likely.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee (QSC) /forum/post/16869065


A cable would need some sort of series capacitance to reduce bass frequencies, so that's not likely.

AFAIK, most MIT cables have "black boxes" built into the cables?
 
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