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i just purchased the av-9000 and hope to find a rotel RMB-1095 amp for my 5.1 paradigm ref system(studios;100s/cc/adp/serv015).


i noticed the rotel 1095 has both single and balanced (xlr) input connectors but i cannot tell what the av-9000 has. anyone familiar with the output connectivity of the av-9000? also, if the av-9000 only has single output connectors would it make sense to purchase xlr/xlr cables and use a rca/xlr connector on the av-9000 output.


thanks for any advice
 

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I can only presume you are reffering to the Marantz AV-9000?


If you are, the outputs are all single ended RCAs. If your Rotel amp has single ended inputs use them. The converters will only benefit you in feeling good about that little "click" when you slide the XLR connector into the amp, and about spending more money than is needed. Stick with the RCA outputs until you get a pre-pro with balanced outputs, but don't sweat it.
 

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On this topic, assuminng I have to adapt from RCA to balanced, is there any advantage to XLR vs. 1/4" TRS? My balanced components all have both.


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mother,


Properly adapting RCA to balanced adds more electronics in the path with the possibility of it messing up the sound. Unbalanced vs balanced is usually irrelevant in the short cable runs of most home environments, since they normally have very little electrical noise. Using a cable-only adaptor introduces another connection that could fail. It adds no audio noise rejection advantage whatsoever, since the signal itself wouldn't be balanced (aka differential).


Brandon,


TRS has the advantage of being somewhat quicker to connect and disconnect, since it just takes a yank. XLR provides a more secure fastening.


I've always felt uncomfortable with tip and ring connections because they tend to graze against one another while cables are being plugged and unplugged. This can do nasties to electronics and speakers if the power is on.


Anyhow, XLR is better for relatively fixed studio (and home) setups as well as for connections where there are likely to be irregular tugs on the cable

(as for microphones), while TRS is better for situations where quick equipment setup and breakdown is important, or where you'd prefer the cable come unplugged rather than be damaged when someone trips over it.
 
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