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Discussion Starter #1
Am soon picking up a used Yamaha M-65 (probably about 30 years old?) to power my L/R Polk RTi12 front speakers.

My question is what, if anything at present is the consensus of opinion about:

  1. Seems to be working fine at present. Should I do anything at all?
  2. Should I have it "looked at" and/or "reconditioned" by a pro?
  3. By a Yamaha-certified pro?
  4. Approximately, how much is that likely to cost?
  5. Should I simply enjoy it as is, let it last until it doesn't, and then replace it?

This is my first foray into amplifiers. I am delighted with the sound of my speakers presently (and with the complementary Outlaw sub). However, "experts" keep telling me how much better my Polks will sound when receiving "adequate" power. While I do not listen at "loud" levels generally, I would be even more delighted if the amp performs its intended purpose--to broaden, deepen, and clarify even more the notes and sounds I hear presently.

So, there you have it, and I will welcome the thoughts, and experiences of those who can comment from their own. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Am soon picking up a used Yamaha M-65 (probably about 30 years old?) to power my L/R Polk RTi12 front speakers.

My question is what, if anything at present is the consensus of opinion about:

  1. Seems to be working fine at present. Should I do anything at all?
  2. Should I have it "looked at" and/or "reconditioned" by a pro?
  3. By a Yamaha-certified pro?
  4. Approximately, how much is that likely to cost?
  5. Should I simply enjoy it as is, let it last until it doesn't, and then replace it?

This is my first foray into amplifiers. I am delighted with the sound of my speakers presently (and with the complementary Outlaw sub). However, "experts" keep telling me how much better my Polks will sound when receiving "adequate" power. While I do not listen at "loud" levels generally, I would be even more delighted if the amp performs its intended purpose--to broaden, deepen, and clarify even more the notes and sounds I hear presently.

So, there you have it, and I will welcome the thoughts, and experiences of those who can comment from their own. Thanks!
Moderator,

Please help. I THOUGHT I was posting this in the Receivers, Amps, and Processors section. Might you move it, please? Thank you.
 

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I have an old Yamaha M-80, so the amps are very similar. You can find a local amplifier repair shop and they will clean, test, set the bias, and potentially replace failed components such as capacitors. Make sure they replace components with genuine parts that are identical in performance. You might have to ship the amp somewhere to get it done.
 

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Am soon picking up a used Yamaha M-65 (probably about 30 years old?) to power my L/R Polk RTi12 front speakers.

My question is what, if anything at present is the consensus of opinion about:

  1. Seems to be working fine at present. Should I do anything at all?
  2. Should I have it "looked at" and/or "reconditioned" by a pro?
  3. By a Yamaha-certified pro?
  4. Approximately, how much is that likely to cost?
  5. Should I simply enjoy it as is, let it last until it doesn't, and then replace it?

This is my first foray into amplifiers. I am delighted with the sound of my speakers presently (and with the complementary Outlaw sub). However, "experts" keep telling me how much better my Polks will sound when receiving "adequate" power. While I do not listen at "loud" levels generally, I would be even more delighted if the amp performs its intended purpose--to broaden, deepen, and clarify even more the notes and sounds I hear presently.

So, there you have it, and I will welcome the thoughts, and experiences of those who can comment from their own. Thanks!

If it is still working after all these years, it probably needs no servicing. If it does, I would expect to pay $200 or so.

It probably has enough power, although Yamaha's power ratings in that era were grossly overstated.

In terms of sound quality, though, I would not expect very much. There are lots of amplifiers that sound better.

I bought a Yamaha amp that was rated for 120 watts per channel back around 1980 (for $795), and it sounded crappy, and would not drive my Polk RTA12 studio monitor speakers without severe distortion on peaks. I returned it. That was a LOT of money back then, and it was a piece of crap.

I replaced it with a NAD 3020 amp, which cost a lot less money ($198) and was only rated for 25 watts per channel, and it was much better at driving my speakers; it sounded wonderful.

I have always had a rather low opinion of Yamaha amps since then; way overpriced and way over-rated.

You could buy a Music Hall 15.3 amplifier for $549, and it will sound much nicer and have plenty of power.

You can also get a NAD C326BEE for $549, and it also sounds very good.
 

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^^ That's a good point - about servicing - you might consider just plugging it in and listening to it. If it sounds good, maybe you would not do anything to it. That's what I did on my M-80.

While I agree that NAD amps are some of the best sounding amps, I differ in that these old Yamahas can sound really good. And the power ratings for my M-80 are actually understated compared to a measurement that was taken in a 1984 Stereo Review magazine. I cannot find one for the M-65.

That said, just plug it in and listen and let your ears be the judge.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
^ Agree. And am purchasing from a knowledgeable person and good friend. He loves the Yamaha M series, and says his preferences are the 60/65 and 80/85. He is confident that I will notice a powerful difference. My wish would be that the Yammie and I BOTH enjoy long life together, before any "resuscitation" decisions must be made! ;)
 

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Well, the M-80 was known for being a bad design and blowing up on folks at the most inopportune times. The M-85 fixed all those poorly designed elements. But like anything else, some are unlucky but most don't have problems.
 
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