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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you fair against this chart?


I can't hear much above 14-15khz (I'm 29). Even when I was a teen, prior to having been exposed to loud sound, I couldn't ever hear above 17khz.


So I've lost 2.5khz of hearing in 15years, over that period of time I've been listening to 1000's of hours of music above 110db-C / 85db-A.


I find this chart rather disturbing, as this is the average.

and they say men lose it faster as well.



According to this chart, music should start sounding significantly worse and worse for anyone over the age of 35.





Compared to the average person in this chart, I've aged my hearing by 2 years beyond expected.



Side Note:

Oddly enough as I've continued to age and lose more and more hearing, via listening experience I've actually gained greater perception of speaker distortions than when I was younger with better hearing.



For example: when I walk into best-buy and hear their speaker/AVR selection quality, I have to leave the room after vomiting in disgust. I just can't fathom how people enjoy such sound systems?



Anyways... looks like time is truely ticking against us in this hobby, if you don't complete your uber-system by the time you hit 35 you're basically SOL (for most people / on average).
 

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I'm 49 and can hear 14KZ fine and can't hear squat at 15KZ and above.

I'm probably exactly like kgveteran, probably rolls off at 14.5KZ.

My kids 17 and 19 hear 17KZ no problem and a little at 18KZ.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If it is a bell-curve average, then 25% will have no significant loss in hearing, and 25% will have far-worse than normal.

The other 50% will be within 2 standard deviations of the average.


Looks like stats class was 50% useful in the Real-World after all... plus or minus 50%
 

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I'm 36 and hadn't tested my hearing in a long time until just now. While mine has deteriorated some, I can still hear up to 18k, although the volume has to be increased as soon as I pass 16k. I've been a drummer for 20+ years but have always been diligent about using ear plugs. I am also the guy that you see at rock concerts with plugs in. I want to keep it as long as I can!
 

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I am 42 and I have a loss at certain frequencies. I am fine to 15khz and then 16-18khz is down but it is fine again at 19 and 20 khz. My audiologists said I probably just need a good cleaning or something to that effect. Anyways, I listen at reference all the time and to those that skeptics, it does not cause hearing damage. Just make sure the system can play that loud cleanly.
 

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I'm 34 and 14.75ishkhz is my limit. Last time I went to audiologist they said my low end was affected more than the high end but don't remember exactly what frequency I fell off at on the low end. They were quite surprised by my lack of hearing on the low end though. High end is just a flip of the coin on whether you begin losing it or not as even those that haven't been exposed for extended periods of time still have a great chance of being affected.
 

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I'm 57 (last year) and my ears are good to 14KHz... and that's down 0.1KHz due to noise exposure - happened to check frequency limit before/after concert. In college, it was more like 19.5KHz at 20 yrs.


While I attended dozens of shows as a youth, that was when promoters were just figuring out that the trick to making a bad band sound good was to up the sound level, and my day-to-day life is very quiet. I never drive with the driver's window open, for example, even though the car's not air conditioned, and heve never owned a motorcycle. Both of those can deafen you quite easily....


HAve fun,

Frank
 

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What the chart doesn't take into account is the brains compensation. Although it may not "restore" hearing, it may alter the perception of sound to bring it back to a natural state. If the hearing loss is great, then the brain can't compensate enough. That's where it's important to take care of your ears.
 

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30 and 17 khz as of my last testing. My wife of the same age is at 16khz. I don't think I'm really missing those last 3khz or so..
 

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33 and have hearing damage that limits the upper frequencies quite a bit. My dip is closer to the age 40 bracket, but with a more pronounced rolloff past 6k. I can hear up to 13k reasonably turned up (some dips here and there), but nothing much past that.


90% of that hearing damage was not musically induced.
 

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Hello old thread,

I have been obsessing over my hearing ability. About 2 years ago I went to a small club where a few bands played, and one was -too damned loud- cleared the place out, we all worked our way to the back of the room, then outside. it was terrible. but, the damage was done. And I have had very minor tinnitus since then.

My worst noise exposure has been in small clubs with oversized sound systems. I did not have ear plugs for most of those occasions. And for all but one time I only had temporary ringing that went away within minutes to a few hours.

Timing is everything, this was like 3 months after I got my first DAC, and was finally upgrading my sound system into the better than just pretty good range. I haven't lost any enjoyment of music, and as far as I can tell still have about the same range of sensitivity that I had ~8 years ago ( as documented in an amazon review I made comparing freq response of 2 different head phones ). I wear ear plugs now. At least I am doing what I can to prevent further hearing damage.

Anyways. Chiming in with my range results.

I am 37, I can hear up to 16 kHz flat as a pancake, then it rolls off fast to 17kHz where I can barely hear anything. I can still make out up to 20kHz but I need to turn the volume way up.

I have tried with a few different speakers and headphones. I was especially scared because I was doing my first test with a pair of etymotic ER4P that cut off themselves very sharply around 16 kHz.

It does seem to be the case that there is very little ( like almost none ) audio info in recordings above 15khz. I spent some time playing with high pass filters in Audacity on a bunch of recordings. So far I dont think I am missing too much. Very relieved.

I always had a decent ear for distortion, but the finer details of music keep coming out. I have been listening to some of the same music for 25 years and still pick out new details every so often. The brain gets better at listening, even if the ears are getting weaker.

Also this seems to be in the totally wrong place in the forum... found it via google.
 

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over 65 and according to REW, I can see a speaker response over 6.5K but Poppa don't hear it . . .

For those interested, @audiocheck.net, along with test tones and sweeps etc.,
they have a hearing test worth a few minutes of time

YMMV
 

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Im 39 and when my allergies are under control, I can hear the mosquito sound at audiocheck.net Having bad allergies means I get fluid in my ears and when that happens I dip down to 14khz ish.

In other news, you can now DIY your own Brown Note!!!

http://www.audiocheck.net/testtones_brownnote.php
 

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Hearing loss does occur due to aging. But, many of us music lover have also trained ourselves to pick-up subtle changes in music and still can appreciate things better than the average person our age and even younger people. The midrange is where most of what we enjoy occurs and we can be grateful for that.:)
 

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At 45, mine now rolls off steeply at 16.5K. 5 years ago I could hear 18KHz. 15 years ago it was 19KHz. This is frustrating. I do protect my hearing WAY more than anyone I know.

I agree that critical listening is something that can be learned. However, you must be able to hear. :D
 

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My girlfriend's nephew was born nearly deaf. He wears a prosthetic/cochlear implant. Its obviously not ideal. I wonder if given another 20-30 years of tech we will have the option of prosthetic upgrades to our hearing ( as well as all over senses ) Direct input to the brain. Or maybe nifty nanotech-stem-cell therapies to rebuild our own hearing bits.

Audiophiles will need to of course spend extra to get the better model implants. Imagine native hearing up to 90 kHz or something equally crazy. Hyper-music.

Oh yeah. Another thing. When I was younger I had a lot of wax buildup. To the point that if I laid on my side my ear would close up. I had them cleared out at the doctors, and realized I had been compensating for years. That probably really helped me in 2 folds. One I was physically protected from loud noises. 2, my brain got used to working really hard to hear things.
 
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