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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to install a z-wave 103 3-way switch. The instructions state that "if multiple neutrals are tied together in one box separate the neutrals to preserve the integrity of the circuit" -


My problem is that in my box, there are 2 other switches. There's only 1 total wire carrying my hot from the source. If I were to separate them out... doesn't that mean my other 2 switches are dead and I'd have to run a new wire from the source for them to operate? Does this mean that a 3-way zwave MUST be on it's own circuit?


BTW - I'm a noob when it comes to electrical stuff (as you may have guessed). I'm just crossing my fingers that this will work without the need to run another wire.


Thanks for help


R
 

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Discussion Starter #3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Targus /forum/post/0


They're talking about neutral, you're talking about the hot wire. They're not the same.

Maybe I'm wrong (and I could be), but doesn't each neutral have to be connected back to the neutral from the source in order to complete the circuit?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chumad /forum/post/0


There's only 1 total wire carrying my hot from the source.

You should be fine then. I am guessing that they are referring to instances where multiple circuits are coming into one box and electricians sometimes do the easy, and also wrong, thing of wiring all the neutrals together.


As long as you only have one feed/neutral coming in you should be fine.
 

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This came up before and here was the response.




It would be rare for a residence to have more than one neutral. There may be many neutral wires. But, all of these wires are connected together all the way back to the panel & subsequently to the ground. It is similar for the hot wires. But, in the case of the hot wires there are usually two hots. So, two hots & a neutral. 120 volts from either hot to neutral & 240 volts from hot to hot. Three phase services are different. But, it is very rare to have a three phase service in a residence.


In my case the switches are tied to a common neutral, ie: the house only has one neutral. I don't understand what HomePro means when they say separate the multiple neutrals in the box. The load requires a neutral to function. Multiple neutral wires in a box in a residence just means a junction point for one house neutral. In other words nothing is going to work unless the neutrals are tied together. If HomePro is suggesting that a separate neutral wire be ran from the switch all the way back to the panel then they should say this in there description. But, I doubt if they would sell many switches and I doubt it would make any difference to the switch integrety.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68sting /forum/post/0


I don't understand what HomePro means when they say separate the multiple neutrals in the box.

What they mean is they don't want neutrals from two different circuits joined to gether in a box. Yes, they all go back to the same place, but as anyone who has been shocked by a neutral (I have) knows that neutrals can have current.


See Case #2: http://www.inspect-ny.com/electric/multiwir.htm


My guess is that this is more of a CYA than an issue that affect the switches. They don't want someone one turning off the power to the circuit and then getting shocked because the neutral was wired in as part of a still energized circuit.


Also, remember to wire devices in this order: Ground, Neutral and then Hot.
 

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From the FAQ on lutron.com ( http: //www .lutron. com /product_technical /FAQ.asp#OLE_LINK13 )


"WHY DO MY LIGHTS FLASH OR SUDDENLY CHANGE LEVELS ?

You may be experiencing a common neutral interaction. Common neutral interaction is cross talk between dimmers that share the same neutral wire. This may cause the lights to flicker, flash or suddenly change intensity. When solid-state dimmers are operating, voltage spikes occur and are transmitted onto the neutral wire. Normally this is of little concern, except when the neutral wire is common to two or more phases of a 120/208V, 3-phase, 4-wire system. Under this condition, the voltage spikes may feed back to the dimmers via the common neutral wire, causing interacting between the dimmers. ..."


Note: Residential power is 2-phase, not 3-phase so this is unlikely to affect residential use.
 
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