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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,


I've been trolling AVS for years, and it's finally time to build my own theater. Technically, it's my second home theater but the first one was kinda lame and kinda small.


I'm going to use this thread as a way of keeping track of the build both for myself and for others to see, so hopefully there won't be too many pictures making this thread boring.



I just starting "building" today. In fact, I have to destroy a part of my basement in order to prepare for the build. I have some gyprock to remove and a wall to build.


Theater info:


Room size: 19' x 17'

Seating: 2 rows, front row of 3, back row on riser (12" high) of 4

Screen size: 106-110" Carada Criterion

Projector: Unknown as of yet (suggestions for approx $2-3k max)

Speakers: Front and center unknown as of yet. Rears: Boston Acoustics, Sub: Velodyne

Processor: Integra DHC9.9, but this could change


Here are some before pictures and I've made a bit of progress by tearing away the gyprock on the front wall which will eventually be where the screen will be.


Looking towards the front wall where the screen will be:



The right and left side of the room:




Looking towards where the back wall will eventually be (behind it is a playroom):



And by the "end" of day 1 (there was a lot of prep work so I didn't get much REAL work done yet):



A shot of the plastic sheet I've put up while building the wall and tearing things apart:



So now it's question time.
First of all, as you can all see, I have two big windows on the left side. I don't know what to do about them. I have to keep them in the wall because of the overall look of the house. Here's what the house looks like from the outside:



The windows are on the bottom left. As you can see they kinda mirror the symmetry of the windows above them (the living room).


So, I have a ledge on the wall the windows are on (you can see if you look at the picture carefully). So I could quite easily build a structure to cover the windows and make a full straight wall. I am just wondering if this is safe and if there is a good way to do this. I will put some kind of reflective sticker on the windows so you can't see into the house and then I can put insulation, sealant, or whatever else to make sure there's no humidity build up, etc...


Can anyone steer me in the right direction here?


Here is a quick sketch I did in Chief Architect. The seating is wrong, but the overall idea is there:



So that's all I've got for you all today. I have no idea how long this is going to take, but I'll be sure to keep things up to date here.


Thanks in advance for any help you guys can give with respect to the windows!
 

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On those windows do you have any other emergency egress windows or doors from the basement. If no, don't cover them up. While they don't technically qualify as emergency exits because of the floor to sill height and the size of the window. I think you could get out in an emergency.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Bigmouth,


There are two other windows out of the basement, yes. Both are as hard to get up to but they're there.



I'm taking all the drywall down to have a clean slate for the construction phase. I'm going to be running a lowered portion of the ceiling to mirror where the duct is and then putting insulation everywhere so I need access. Not to mention for wiring.


I really like your idea of the step and I might just do that, thanks!


Any ideas how to cover up the windows?
 

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Robert...I would just make plugs for the windows...You could construct them using a 2x4 frame with plywood covering (overhang)...Kinda like the front of a drawer...Then just cover it up with the acoustic panels...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Chuck,


Thanks for there reply. So I was thinking of putting some kind of reflective sticker on the windows so that people from the outside don't see insulation, then I was thinking of building a frame out of 2x4s as you mentioned, then stuffing insulation in there and then covering in plywood, also as you mentioned as I'll be using that surface to anchor the lowered part of the ceiling which runs around the theater (and eventually has crown molding and rope lights and such). So I guess there's no concerns for humidity. That's good to know! Thanks!
 

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If you are going to be using any linacoustic in your build you can just stick some up in the windows with the black side facing out as part of your plugging process.


In my house I hung a vinyl blind in the window in the closed position to match others on that side of the house, Then I added some plywood, insulation and finally just drywalled right over the window.


In your case I would be tempted to do a good looking window plug if you are concerned about getting your house ready for resale quickly.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zax123 /forum/post/17053831


Chuck,


Thanks for there reply. So I was thinking of putting some kind of reflective sticker on the windows so that people from the outside don't see insulation, then I was thinking of building a frame out of 2x4s as you mentioned, then stuffing insulation in there and then covering in plywood, also as you mentioned as I'll be using that surface to anchor the lowered part of the ceiling which runs around the theater (and eventually has crown molding and rope lights and such). So I guess there's no concerns for humidity. That's good to know! Thanks!

Yeah no problemo..."Bigs" idea of putting in blinds in the closed position is a good one...I'd do that first so it will look good from the outside...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zax123 /forum/post/17054107


Yeah so I was thinking of finding some kind of sticker with a mirror finish, and that's what people would see from the outside... then I wouldn't have to bury blinds in there...

you could always paint a piece of thin plywood black and cover it and from a distance it will just look dark and blacked out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So I'm done what I set out to day for day 2... keep in mind that I'm working evenings after work, after supper, after entertaining the kids and sometimes putting them to bed... so I won't get much done on weekdays.



In any case, I took apart the left wall and prepared the windows to be covered up tonight. Here's the result (lots of dust in the room so the flash shows off the spots on my lens):




Tomorrow evening I'll attack the right wall or the ceiling, we'll see.


I ordered my seating today. They is a back row of 4 with the loveseat conversion in the middle, and a front row of 3. They are all black leather with power reclines. I ordered the EXACT same thing as dogone, so they will look like this (hope you don't mind I stole your pic Chuck):




For the windows, the final verdict is I'll be putting on a tint sticker from the local hardware store and then building the frame for the inset part of the wall with 2x4s on their side as I only have 1.5" clearance from the inset part of the wall to the 2x4s which make up the lower part of the wall. Just enough for 2x4s on their side. I was considering covering up the windows with a piece of black-painted plywood, but I just don't have the room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So day 3 has come and gone. Let's just say things are going slowly because I'm doing this alone and because I do it after work, etc...


Tonight, all I did was rip off half of the ceiling:



Hopefully all the DEstruction will be done soon so I can start the CONstruction this weekend...


In other news, my seating shipped ALREADY. I guess things must be slow at the factory... these had to be custom made, so to be ordered one day and shipped the next -- must mean they aren't too busy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Oh... if anybody's listening...



The floor is currently "floating floor". It's a thin laminate of about 8mm (about 1/4") that snaps together in pieces. Under it is a little felt and then the concrete floor of the basement. I was wondering if I should keep the floating floor or if I should rip it out and put the carpet on top of that.


Any advice?


Thanks in advance!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zax123 /forum/post/17063514


Oh... if anybody's listening...



The floor is currently "floating floor". It's a thin laminate of about 8mm (about 1/4") that snaps together in pieces. Under it is a little felt and then the concrete floor of the basement. I was wondering if I should keep the floating floor or if I should rip it out and put the carpet on top of that.


Any advice?


Thanks in advance!

I would leave it myself....I mean unless it's all crumbling apart or something...If it's in good shape just leave it...
 

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I vote leave it, but I would talk to a couple of carpet shops to see if they bring up any issues that we haven't thought of. I anticipate that it will be more difficult to secure the perimeter tack trips assuming the laminate is thin and brittle. The nails used in the strips may not get as a good grip. But I am sure they have experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Bigmouth,


Yeah, the problem is the floating floor is just that -- floating. So it's not bolted to the floor. If the carpet nails don't go deep enough, the carpet could life. I will definitely speak to a carpet place, and it would take a total of 15 minutes to take the floor up, so it's no big deal.


Thanks all for the opinions!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zax123 /forum/post/17056938


For the windows, the final verdict is I'll be putting on a tint sticker from the local hardware store.

Be careful with hadware store window tint. I've personally seen it break down due to direct sunlight. My neighbor puts new stuff up every year. The tint he put up in January of this year is already cracked and peeling. The sun hits the window for approximately 3-4 hours (morning) every day on an east facing window. If you put it on your window and close up the wall, you could potentially have an ugly issue down the road.
 

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When I covered over my windows I removed the inside lock and screwed the window tightly shut with stainless steel screws from the outside. That way if a mouse decides to crawl up in the window and die I have a way of getting in there without tearing down my wall or breaking the window.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/17065714


When I covered over my windows I removed the inside lock and screwed the window tightly shut with stainless steel screws from the outside. That way if a mouse decides to crawl up in the window and die I have a way of getting in there without tearing down my wall or breaking the window.

First of all... how morbid!



Second of all, great idea.
I'll do the same!
 
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